NEW SUMMER SEASONAL MENU!

From the beginning of June to end of September, our new Bushwakker Seasonal Menu features some fresh food choices including our Butter Chicken Naan Wrap, Grilled Citrus Trio Chicken on Sundried Tomato Pesto Orzo, Whisky & Herb Beef Tenderloin Medallions, Strawberry Rhubarb Pie with Vanilla Bean Ice Cream and our Chipotle Bacon Sirloin Burger topped with Green Apple Salsa.

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BUSHWAKKER STAINLESS STEEL GROWLERS ARE NOW HERE!

It’s all about freshness! Right from our tap to your home. Refillable containers designed for beer are very popular across North America and are finally available at Bushwakker! The Bushwakker stainless steel growler is an attractive and very resilient vessel that will help protect your beer from damaging light. Artwork by Joe Fafard. Limited quantities available. Release date: June 13.

Wakker Wear

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - June 3, 2014

Gold Medal Recipient

Regina’s independent, family owned and operated Bushwakker Brewpub has once again received national brewing gold. The judges at the 2014 Canadian Brewing Awards deemed the Bushwakker’s Regina Pale Ale as the very best English Pale Ale in the entire country.

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Regina Pale Ale  Ale

A British Pale Ale or Special Bitter, well balanced between malt and aftertaste, with a hint of caramel. Medium amber

ALC/VOL 4.5% | OG== 1047 | 33 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Dungarvon Irish Red Ale  Ale

An Irish Red or an American Amber Ale, rich, buttery, with low hop aftertaste. Very red.

ALC/VOL 5.0% | OG== 1050 | 19 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Palliser Porter  Ale

A robust Porter, malty sweetness with bitterness and burnt flavour from black malt. Opaque black.

ALC/VOL 5.8 | OG== 1057 | 43 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Black & Tan  Ale

A traditional blend of Regina Pale Ale and Palliser Porter.

ALC/VOL | OG== | IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Cheryl's Blond Ale  Ale

Brewed to Cheryl's exacting standards, light and refreshing. Light body, golden colour, refreshing flavour.

ALC/VOL 4.9% | OG== 1045 | 20 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

MacGregor's Wee Heavy  Ale

A particular type of Scotch Ale, our Wee Heavy is full-bodied with a caramel-like flavour. The yeast character imparts a touch of smoke. It's a Scottish-style sweet nectar.

ALC/VOL 7.0 | OG== 1070 | 26 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Bombay IPA  Ale

The India Pale Ale style was originally brewed for the British troops stationed in India in the 18th century. Lots of body, alcohol and bitterness.

ALC/VOL 6.8% | OG== 1065 | 55 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Arctic Dark  Lager

A Munich Dark Lager, with medium body, toasted malty sweetness, medium aftertaste. Light brown.

ALC/VOL 5.0% | OG== 1060 | 23 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Baron Bock  Ale

Traditional Bock, full body, malty sweetness, toasted chocolate flavour, low aftertaste. Dark brown.

ALC/VOL 6.0% | OG== 1060 | 31 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Black Currant Ale  Ale

Our newest fruit beer offering boasts the addition of 126 pounds of black currants to our blond ale. Very well balanced and quite refreshing.

ALC/VOL 4.9% | OG== 1045 | 20 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Blackberry Mead  Specialty

Macerated blackberries are added to our Lumsden Valley honey mead. The resulting brew is a sparkling, semi-sweet mead with a deep pinkish hue. Available in very early December for a very short time.

ALC/VOL 8.0% | OG== 1080 | 0 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Bushvar Czech Pils  Lager

Made with local malt and spciality imported Czech Saaz hops.

ALC/VOL 5.3% | OG== 1049 | 40 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Chico IPA  Ale

A North American India Pale Ale, big malt and citrusy hop aroma and bitterness. In fact, if you concentrate your senses you will think "grapefruit"! The flagship style for the whole craft beer movement and the choice of craft-beer aficionados. Not for some craft-beer novices.

ALC/VOL 6.8% | OG== 1064 | 100+ IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Chinook ESB  Ale

An India Pale Ale or Extra Special Bitter. A big ESB, well balanced with lots of malt sweetness and hop aftertaste. Dark amber.

ALC/VOL 5.8% | OG== 1055 | 32 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Classic Vienna  Lager

Rich malt flavours with a hop balance.

ALC/VOL 5.5% | OG== 1057 | 30 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Dortmunder Blend  Lager

A blend of our Stubblejumper Pilsner and our Last Mountain Lager. It is our interpretation of the soft, well balanced beers of the city of Dortmund, Germany.

ALC/VOL | OG== | IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Fruit Beers  Specialty

During the summer we infuse our beers with various fruits. Peaches, cherries, raspberries, plums...very quenching!

ALC/VOL | OG== | IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Granny's Bitter  Ale

Lower alcohol contents makes this a wonderful session beer for hopheads.

ALC/VOL 4.0% | OG== 1040 | 56 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Harbinger Maibock  Lager

Smooth malty lager resurrected and reformulated by brewer Mitch.

ALC/VOL 6.2% | OG== 1063 | 25 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Harvest Lager  Lager

An Oktoberfest Lager, with still more malt flavour and body than our Last Mountain Lager. Medium amber.

ALC/VOL 5.8% | OG== 1060 | 26 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Honey Thistle Wit  Ale

Very refreshing, medium-bodied wheat beer with citrus aroma and secret spices. Voted # 1 summer beer on CBC radio.

ALC/VOL 4.8% | OG== 1044 | 20 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Kai's Munich Helles  Lager

Kai was a student from Germany who trained with us to gain brewing experience. His Munich Helles style beer is his interpretation of a much-loved beer from his home country. Golden, malty and gentle.

ALC/VOL 5.2% | OG== 1050 | 20 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Last Mountain Lager  Lager

A Vienna style lager, maltier and less hoppy than the Pilsners. Light amber colour.

ALC/VOL 5.2 | OG== 1047 | 25 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Missiletow Ale  Specialty

A barley wine or Christmas ale, very high malt and alcohol flavour with medium hop aftertaste. Dark amber

ALC/VOL 8.0% | OG== 1077 | 42 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Northern Lights Lager  Lager

A light Pilsener style lager, our beer closest to industrial beer, but with just a little more body and less alcohol flavour. Light straw colour.

ALC/VOL 4.5 | OG== 1041 | 20 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Pickard's Oatmeal Cream Stout  Ale

A so-called "foreign stout", fuller body and less sweetness than Palliser, more burnt flavour. Opaque black.

ALC/VOL 7.0% | OG== 1070 | 51 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Ponce De Leon

Our most popular fruit beer features 42 pounds of blackberries and 42 pounds of raspberries in every tank. Named after the Spanish conquistador who searched for the fountain of youth.

ALC/VOL 4.9% | OG== 1045 | 20 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Premium Pale Ale  Ale

Made with premium ingredients: Maris Otter malt and Kent Golding hops.

ALC/VOL 4.5% | OG== 1047 | 33 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Procrastinator Dopplebock  Specialty

Made with all specialty malts and just enough hops to balance out the sweetness.

ALC/VOL 8.5% | OG== 1084 | 40 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Red & Black  Ale

A sweeter, maltier version of our Black & Tan, made with Dungarvon Irish Red Ale and Palliser Porter.

ALC/VOL | OG== | IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Sloughshark Lager  Lager

A blend of our Arctic Dark Lager and Stubblejumper Pilsener. Think of it as a Black & Tan, lager style.

ALC/VOL | OG== | IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Sodbuster Brown  Ale

A traditional Northern English Brown Ale with a toffee-like, lightly caramelly character and a medium-dry finish.

ALC/VOL 5.0 | OG== 1050 | 20 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Stubblejumper Pilsener  Lager

A European style Pilsner, with more body and more hop aroma and aftertaste, dryer than most Pilsners. Medium straw colour.

ALC/VOL 5.2 | OG== 1047 | 30 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Summer Wheat  Ale

A German style wheat beer, light dry body, estery flavour with hints of clove. Low hop aftertaste. Cloudy, with a light straw colour.

ALC/VOL 4.5% | OG== 1044 | 18 IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

Today's Guest Import Draught

Cactus Tap tequila barrel aged and Agave Cerveza from the Prairie Sun Brewery in Saskatoon. $6.95 pint.

ALC/VOL N/A | OG== N/A | N/A IBU

OUR FAMOUS SUDS

The Strathdee Ghost

Before 1912 the corner of Cornwall and Dewdney was occupied by a Chinese Laundry. We don’t know how big it was and how much of the space that is now the Strathdee building was used for the laundry. It was destroyed by the great cyclone of 1912, which was, in fact, a tornado. Dozens were trapped in the rubble of the buildings that were torn apart by the tornado. The Ackerman building across the street was only partly damaged, as you can see in the pictures on our west wall. In true Regina tradition, hundreds came to the warehouse area to free those trapped. British actor William Henry Pratt was appearing in a play in Regina at the time of the storm. In the aftermath, he volunteered as a rescue worker. Years later, he would move to Hollywood and change his name to Boris Karloff. In the 1960s, Karloff appeared on the talk and game show Front Page Challenge where he was featured not because of his notoriety in horror films, but because of his involvement in the Regina Cyclone of 1912.

The man who is responsible for the creation of the Strathdee building was named Stewart. He planned the biggest and handsomest warehouse building in Regina. It was to be the Cadillac among warehouses, and it still is. It was built in 1913 and 1914 and opened in the spring of 1914. He brought young James Strathdee from Winnipeg to manage it.  

Railway cars would be unloaded at the rear, on tracks that ran next to the building. An army of workers moved goods to the six large floors for storage (before the days of palate jacks.) Owners of the many small country stores came to the area under the tin ceiling to look over the goods for sale; cloth, flower, dried beans, etc., and make their orders which were hauled away in trucks from loading docks on the east side of the building.>

James and his wife lived in the Cathedral area and was a member of Regina’s “elite”, as the manager of the Stewart-Strathdee building. As business expanded a new Scot, named Campbell, was brought from Winnipeg to be assistant manager. It was now the Stewart-Strathdee-Campbell building.

In the early 1930’s, James Strathdee was returning from Calgary by motor vehicle. Somewhere near Swift Current he was involved in a major auto accident. He sustained serious injuries, including head injuries. He recovered, but he was never himself. Because of his diminished capacity, he began to loose authority to his assistant, Campbell. He became more and more depressed. He was found one October morning in the late 1930’s lying on the tracks across the street with his head nearly blown off and a shotgun lay nearby.

The police called it suicide, but many questions remain unanswered. Why did he choose such an unlikely place and time to do himself in?
Campbell took over. Eventually the patterns of distribution changed and the role of the great warehouse declined. It became an Eaton’s warehouse. Then part of the building was used for offices and storage by the Saskatchewan Liquor Board. Then it became Regina Modern Furniture, and then the Strathdee Mall and the Bushwakker Brewpub. Now it is a mixture of residential condominiums, offices, shops and The Bushwakker.

In recent years people working in the building have begun reporting strange events, At night people claim that they have seen a man with a full beard and 1930’s clothing. He is usually seen “out of the corner of the eye”, late at night. Others claim to experience a sudden chilling draught. One of the most definitive stories is told by Wes. He had his own bakery on the second floor upstairs. He has since worked at the Bushwakker and at the Free House. He says that one night at 3:00 AM a man with a beard and a brown plaid shirt walked past him. He saw the man not directly in front of him, but not “out of the corner of his eye.” Wes put down his work and turned to have a better look, but no one was there.

Those who claim to have seen the apparition assume that it is James Strathdee. They have come to refer to the ghost as “Jim”

One person who refused to accept the possibility that there really is a Jim wandering the building at night was an antique dealer on the third floor named Dave. Dave was working late one night. He finished, turned out the lights, and went to the stairwell. The third floor shops are made secure by closing and locking a big wrought-iron gate. Dave locked the gate and turned off the last light. He then noticed that he had missed a small three-position light that he could still see glowing faintly at the far end of the floor. He said out loud to no one in particular “Darn! Hey Jim, can you turn out that light for me?” Before he could turn to leave the light went from low to medium. He froze. It then went to high, and then off!

One of our line cooks claims to have seen Jim in the Bushwakker area and the brewers report strange draughts. There has been an unusual incident. The boiler that fires our brewhouse is in a room at the north-east corner of the cellar, together with the big boiler that heats the building. Our brewer claims that he went into the boiler room late one afternoon to work on our boiler. He says that the room was locked, empty and in complete darkness until he turned on the light. While he was working, a piece of coal came sailing out of the darkness above the big boiler and bounced off the side of a pail next to him. It happened twice and he decided to leave.

As it happens, our house electrician was working the same day over the boiler and had found some ancient pieces of coal on the top of it. He decided to throw some pieces down into a pail he had noticed below, so he could take them home to show his son. So, either Jim was copying the electrician or the brewer did not find the door locked shut before he entered the room, as he swears was indeed the case.

Jim’s name is Celtic and means “valley of the Dee”, a river that runs from the central highlands to Aberdeen, Scotland. Occupants of the Strathdee Building think that Jim is a reasonably satisfied ghost. He seems to be downright helpful. Perhaps that is because his building often reflects his heritage, with lots of Celtic and Scottish events at the Bushwakker. For instance, the Bushwakker’s next Single Malt Scotch Tasting takes place in late October, with six single malts, a pipe and drum band, highland dancers, and Celtic musicians.

Bev Robertson

Keg Menu

Great Reasons to Buy a Keg

Choice! Light, dark, amber, bitter or malty, if we have it on tap we should be able to fill you a keg. 

Flexibility! Four different sizes to suit any size gathering. 

Easy! Our new kegs are state of the art, easy to use and trouble free. 

Convenient! No empty beer bottles to break or clean up. All you need are beer cups and a bucket of ice to keep your keg cool. 

Fresh! Give us at least 24 hours notice and we'll fill your keg right from our main beer tanks. 

Quality! Voted Regina’s best locally brewed beer. 

Cool! We'll keep your keg in our beer cellar so it will be nice and cold when you pick it up. 

Popular! That's what you'll be when you tell everyone you're having a Bushwakker keg party.

Please allow us 24 hrs to prepare your order!

  • 6 x 650ml - $35
  • 2 Litre Jug - $15
  • 10 Litre Keg (29 Beers) - $60
  • 19 Litre Keg (55 Beers) - $100
  • 30 Litre Keg (85 Beers) - $145
  • 59 Litre Keg (171 Beers) - $275

The Bushwakker History

The sequence of events that lead to the existence of what the Globe and Mail considers to be one of Canada's top five brewpubs, and what some beer hunters consider to be North America's best brewpub, including a regular from Florida, started in 1976 in Stuttgart, Germany. The Robertson family spent the year 1976/77 in that city while Bev was on sabbatical leave at the Universitãt der Stuttgart. He gradually learned to appreciate the local Dortmunder style of beer, but soon moved on to the locally produced premium Pilseners.

On returning to Canada, Bev purchased a bottle of Canadian industrial beer in the Toronto Airport. His first reaction was that someone had accidentally filled the beer bottle with water, but a burp confirmed the presence of carbonation. He decided not to let his beer taste buds deteriorate to the point that he could taste Canadian industrial beer. He purchase European imports for home consumption. However, they were expensive and almost always stale. By 1979 he was looking for an alternative source of beer.

It was suggested during lunch at the University of Regina Faculty Club by Dr. Alex Kelly, Economics, that it was possible to produce full flavoured beers at home. Bev went to Harvest Brewing. He pointed to a picture on the wall of Neueschwanstein Castle, (around which the family had spent many hours on foot and skis and which can be seen in the Club Room) and said "I want to purchase whatever it takes to brew the beer that is brewed where that castle is."

He began brewing with beer kits, using malt extract. Within six weeks he was beginning to supplement the extracts with malt, and within six months he was brewing only full mash beers. He was eventually joined by two others (Keith Wolbaum and Dr. Lynn Mihichuk; several others joined on an occasional basis.). The group normally brewed from 4:00 PM until 12:00 midnight on Mondays during the winter, with a 70 liter batch size, producing typically 15 brews over the winter, or 3,000 12 oz. bottles. Wolbaum, Elaine and Bev had been part of a group that traditionally went for a 10 km. ski trip every Friday in winter, from the university, down Wascana lake and under the Trans-Canada Highway, through the Wascana golf course, over to University Park, past the cemetery, around Douglas Park to the Science Center and back to campus. They called themselves "The Bushwhackers", meaning those who ski making their own trails. The brewing group called themselves the "Bushwhacker Brewers".

During the period 1988 to 1992 Bev was chairman of the Saskatchewan Health Research Board, reporting directly to the Minister of Health. In 1988 he suggested to the conservative government that Saskatchewan should not be the last province to allow brewpubs. Legislation and regulations were put in place in 1989.

The government in power at the time had already been involved in promoting several business initiatives that had proven unrealistic. In order to make brewpubs more successful, they decided to give brewpubs a piece of the Saskatchewan monopoly on the off-sale of cold beer. Of course, those who held that monopoly, the hotels, screamed that it was their God-given right to monopolize off sale. A compromise was reached, allowing two brewpubs in Saskatoon and two in Regina. A competition was held. Many groups were formed to make application for these four brewpub licenses. All made it clear that they were only interested in the access to off-sale. They had no knowledge of the brewpub industry and no interest in gaining any. Several asked Bev to join them to look after the installation of a brewery, which they would actually use if pressed. They had all committed to buying malt extract breweries, which were already showing signs that they were not capable of producing beers of acceptable quality. Bev was encouraged by Grace Lipinski (then manager of the Faculty Club) to go it on his own. He applied for one of the four licenses and was not successful.

One year later a new minister became responsible for the Liquor Board. Bev explained to her that the limit on brewpubs derived from the fact that they had been allowed access to off-sale. He had not asked for off-sale, and it made no marketing sense because brewpubs were, in effect, a protest against the blandness of industrial beer, and now access to something he didn't want was nevertheless preventing him from getting his business started. As a consequence, more brewpubs were soon permitted, but they were not allowed to have off-sale. He applied again for permission to proceed and this time was successful. Work began in the summer of 1990 and the Bushwakker (The spelling of the name was changed at the suggestion of Keith Wolbaum to avoid any trademark problems.) opened on January 25 1991. It has been making its own trails ever since.

During the period 1988 until 1991 in which the legislation was created and the license finally obtained, it had been agreed that Elaine would be the general manager of the Bushwakker. It was decided during 1990 that both Scott and Kelly would also be part of the team.

Developments since 1991 include:

  • All brewpubs have been allowed off-sale if they are 1.6 km from an existing off-sale. (The Bushwakker is not but we have been asking for special permission.)
  • Brewpubs have been allowed to sell their own product for off-premise consumption.
  • Brewpubs have been allowed to wholesale their product in kegs.
  • Our kitchen sales have more than doubled and the size of the kitchen has been doubled.
  • Our brewery is also approaching its full capacity. One reason that our beers are better is that we age them longer. They become more mellow and we don't need to filter them. We can do that because we have the space and we have 25 used tanks from old British pubs. Roughly ten are used for serving and 15 for aging. We also have six double sized new tanks which will add 40% to our production capacity.

The Bushwakker Brewpub was created on the main floor of the Strathdee Building, a classic warehouse in what is known now as Regina's Old Warehouse District. The area contains many restaurants, nightclubs, bars and pool halls.

The Strathdee was built in 1913 out of the rubble of the Great Regina Cyclone (actually a tornado) of 1912, on the site of a former Chinese laundry, and opened in 1914. It was the "Cadillac" warehouse of the area. The front of the main floor housed offices and a display area, with a beautiful pressed tin ceiling. The ceiling was restored to its original glory as part of the Bushwakker development.

The Strathdee was built in 1913 out of the rubble of the Great Regina Cyclone (actually a tornado) of 1912, on the site of a former Chinese laundry, and opened in 1914. It was the "Cadillac" warehouse of the area. The front of the main floor housed offices and a display area, with a beautiful pressed tin ceiling. The ceiling was restored to its original glory as part of the Bushwakker development.

History of the Strathee Building by Stewart and Lillian Mein

Whether you need to or not, take a trip to the washroom before you leave Bushwakker. Now, Heads Up! because on the wall is a framed front page of the Leader Post featuring an article about the city's regiment, the Regina Rifles. One of the workmen who helped renovate this place presented it to the management around the time of Operation Desert Storm, in which Canadians were involved.

The article, dated 27 July 1942, tells about Saskatchewan men going off to the Second World War where they picked up the moniker, "Johns." When these men from the prairies were brigaded with their more sophisticated city cousins in 1940, they became known as "Farmer Johns," a name they came to carry with justifiable pride as they became the toughest, best trained fighting unit in the Canadian army. They proved it by being among those chosen to lead the invasion of Normandy on D-Day. Incidentally, they were the only unit in the entire Allied invasion force to reach and hold their objective.

Of course the regiment has since been given the title "Royal," in part because of its gallant actions on D-Day. On that day Lieutenant Bill Grayson carried out an action not atypical of those taken by many others over the long and honourable history of the Regiment.

The following excerpt from Up the Johns! The Story of the Royal Regina Rifles, currently available in local books stores, tells the story.

At 0830 hours, A Company, still on the beach, reported that it was pinned down and taking casualties from heavy machine gun fire and by rounds from an 88 mm gun from inside the emplacement. In those first few critical minutes the fate of the company's assault hung in the balance.

However, Lieutenant Grayson, commanding 9 platoon, had jumped from his landing craft on crashing the beach and had hurried across the bare expanse of sand through a gap in the wire strung along the beach, to the edge of the first row of houses facing the sea. There, he took cover behind a corner of a house near the German concrete gun emplacement where he could not be observed by the crew inside. The emplacement was at the far end of an alley from the house behind which he was hiding. Between the gun emplacement and himself was more barbed wire and a German MG42 machine gun post. He noticed that the firing from the machine gun came in bursts at timed intervals along a fixed arc of fire.

Grayson checked the timing of the bursts and estimated that he would be able to get past the machine gun and run to the side of the emplacement where he could toss a grenade through the gun slit. Immediately after the next burst from the machine gun, he made a mad dash for the emplacement only to become entangled in the wire that formed the protective barrier for the gun. Miraculously, the next burst of fire was delayed. Grayson tore himself free and tossed in his grenade. On hearing the explosion, he dived in after it through the aperture. He leaped up just in time to see the last of the German gun crew disappearing through the back door of the emplacement.

The rear man, on seeing Grayson, turned and threw a "potato masher" grenade at him, which landed between his legs. Coolly, Grayson reached down, grabbed the handle and threw the grenade back at the German who left abruptly before it exploded. Grayson then followed the Germans into a trench which zig-zagged along to a covered underground protective area. On looking into this dark hole he could make out three or four figures. He heard shouts of "Kamerad," so he motioned with his pistol for them to come out. Out came 35 men whom he promptly took prisoner. By then, other men from A Company had reached the emplacement, and they disarmed the prisoners and led them away. For his daring action Grayson was awarded the Military Cross.

STRATHDEE, THE MAN

*The following is an article on the history of the Strathdee building. It is the second in a series of articles on the Strathdee building, its builders, and the city of Regina at the time it was built. They are prepared in close collaboration and with great assistance from the staff of the Regina Plains Museum, whom we gratefully acknowledge.

The story of James Strathdee is one of personal accomplishment and tragedy. He rose to prominence as one of Regina's first citizens, but died by suicide.

James Strathdee was born in 1876 in the Kincardineshire region of Scotland. His father was a tailor, and he trained and worked as a tailor, but James sought other challenges in life. He and his new wife moved first to Winnipeg after his father died in 1902. He started in the new world as a floor worker for the Campbell Brothers and Wilson Co. in Winnipeg. James worked his way up in the company and won the position of manager of the newly formed Campbell, Wilson and Strathdee Company in Regina in 1911. Strathdee was the third largest shareholder, after Campbell and Wilson. He moved to Regina in 1913, after the Great Cyclone of 1912, to oversee the planning and construction of what we now call the Strathdee building.

His home was at 3151 Angus Street and is now a heritage property, along with the Strathdee warehouse. Some of his family still live in Regina. Strathdee was very much a Regina booster and involved himself in community activities, through his church, the Assiniboia Club, the Canadian Club, the Red Cross and others. He was particularly active in the affairs of the Regina Board of Trade, which evolved into the Regina Chamber of Commerce. The Campbell, Wilson, Strathdee company expanded to Moose Jaw and Swift Current.

In 1933 James Strathdee suffered a head injury in a car accident while travelling in Alberta. He ignored the injury, but others thought that it was serious. His behavior changed after the accident. At the same time he had to face in the company, which he did not control, a new "young Turk" who was rising quickly through the company ranks, J. M. Sinclair. Sinclair gained enough power to squeeze Strathdee out of the company. Strathdee's life had been his company, and he did not take retirement well. He tried to escape to a new life on the coast, but his wife would not leave Regina and her old way of life.

In 1936, Strathdee was found shot to death on the train tracks near the Strathdee building. It was first thought to be a case of murder, but the police later ruled that his death was a case of suicide. The accident, the loss of his business, and the conflict between his plans and his wife's needs are all thought to have contributed to the depression that led to his death.

STRATHDEE, THE BUILDING

*The following is an article on the history of the Strathdee building. It is the first of what we hope will be a series of articles on the Strathdee building, its builders, and the city of Regina at the time it was built. They are prepared in close collaboration and with great assistance from the staff of the Regina Plains Museum, whom we gratefully acknowledge.

The Strathdee building bears witness to Regina's importance as a major wholesale distribution center at the beginning of the twentieth century. Plans for the building began shortly after the Great Cyclone of 1912 levelled many buildings in the Warehouse area. It was opened in March of 1914. The building was designed and built by a Winnipeg architect named J. H. G. Russell. It was named after its owners, the Campbell, Wilson and Strathdee Company.

The Campbell, Wilson, Strathdee grocery warehouse was one of Regina's first warehouses. Russell's design combines aesthetic taste with the classical revival tradition of the late nineteenth century. This style was common in the design of commercial buildings in Canada in the 1910's and 1920's. The style often used architectural form in a symbolic manner. The design of the Strathdee building attempts to unify form and function. The facade has decorative interest, but also reflects the dignity and importance of the use of the building, as a wholesale business with offices.

The two front entrances have heavy stonework, part of which is designed to suggest columns. Scrolled brackets are designed to appear to support the horizontal stone over the entrances. The stonework along the base of the building suggests Italianate influence. The stonework that appears to reinforce the corners of the building is typical of the classical revival tradition. Many other features, such as the large arched first floor windows, the stone belt above the first floor, and the brick masonry patterns and diamond shaped stone inlays support the strong impact of the building.

The offices were located in the area of the first floor which has the pressed tin ceiling. Two important offices were located on either side of what is now the entrance to the BUSHWAKKER BREWPUB. One was occupied by James Strathdee himself. A sample room attractively displayed the "Royal Shield" of goods such as teas, coffee, baking goods and powdered jelly, extracts and spices.

A large walk in vault is located on the main floor. Its entrance is near the door to the annex on the west side of the building. Another large vault is located in the basement. The shipper also had an office on the main floor. The space behind the offices and the upper floors were used as general warehouse space and was usually busy with many workers. The building was originally served by three freight elevators and a dumbwaiter, originally called a "lowerator". It is no longer used, but it sits next to the entrance to the bar in the north east corner of the BUSHWAKKER BREWPUB. Two of the freight elevators are still used, and one may eventually become a personnel elevator.

A railway spur originally served the loading dock at the back of the building and the freight cars that were parked there were easily accessible from the freight elevators.

After its service as a grocery warehouse, the Strathdee building housed the Saskatchewan Liquor Board. Later it became the home of Crescent Furniture, then Modern Home Furniture. Now that it has been restored, it houses a number of diverse businesses, including a unique mall, a software company, a book publisher, a modelling agency, and of course, Regina's only full-mash brewpub.

The massive density of this wood and brick structure conveys a sense of strength and solidity. The Strathdee Building is an impressive representative of the classical revival tradition and of Regina's first generation of warehouses.

The earliest relevant event in the history of the Bushwakker was probably a conference in Prague, in what was then the country of Czechoslovakia, around 1975. We arrived late and hungry. I rushed to a pre-conference evening reception that was just winding down. But first I needed to find a bathroom. I knew that the most common international phrase for bathroom in Europe was the German “WC”, pronounced “vay say”, but I was exhausted from many hours of air travel, and I forgot. Instead I used every English euphemism that I could think of, washroom, outhouse, loo, toilet, lavatory, water closet, etc.

The volunteers from the local university, The Czechoslovakian Agricultural University of Prague, had obviously been warned that they would be dealing with voracious North Americans, spoiled with obscene overconsumption. The visitors would eat everything in site and ask for more. My request for a place to take a leak was met every time with a clearly rehearsed chorus of “It has all been eaten!”

But this being one of the world’s four great brewing nations, there was still a supply of beer available. (Other great brewing nations are Germany, Belgium and Great Britain.) I still remember my first reaction to drinking real Czech beer. It was simply too different from the watery North American product to which I had become accustomed. It’s difficult to confess now, but I drank wine.

Some people adapt to the full flavour of traditional beer styles when they first try a sample of one. Bushwakker brewer Mitch is in that group, but I needed some intermediate beer styles before I was ready for the bigger beer flavours of Europe. That is why the Bushwakker offers intermediate or “cross-over” beers, like Northern Lights Lager, Cheryl’s Blond Ale, Last Mountain Lager and Dungarvon Irish Red Ale.

The food issue did not go away. The cafeteria food was mostly starch. Meat was rarely available and when it was it was nearly inedible. The only thing approaching vegetables or fruit on the menu was a vinegar cucumber salad, served with every lunch and dinner.

The conference was ten-days long, and had a break in the middle. The conferees were treated to a full-day trip and an extended picnic at a beautiful castle and its lush grounds a few hours south of Prague. The conference dealt with new developments in the calculation techniques and software used in my research, which is crystallography. At that time Canada punched above its weight in crystallographic computing, and Canada, Czechoslovakia, Great Britain, and the United States had nearly equivalent and strong representation at the conference.

A group of younger scientists formed at the picnic from those four nationalities and we drank beer and wine together. With the assistance of the locals, we talked one of the buss drivers into staying behind with his bus and we caroused and shared stories into the early hours.

Our co-opted bus eventually made its way back to the University through downtown Prague. As it happened, the popular movement to free Prague from Russian control and the dead weight of communism was already seeded. In the west, folk songs were being inspired by the civil-rights movement, and to our great surprise we discovered that some of these protest songs had become anthems of rebellion against their oppressors with our Czech friends. The bus became a drunken chorus of songs of protest.

I will never forget our bus rolling through Wenceslas Square in central Prague at 3:00 AM, with everyone singing as loud as they could, the then popular civil-rights folksong “If I had a Hammer”, written by Pete Seeger and Lee Hays, and made popular by the group “Peter Paul and Mary”. ( HYPERLINK "http://www.arlo.net/resources/lyrics/hammer-song.shtml" www.arlo.net/resources/lyrics/hammer-song.shtml) We knew the consequences of attracting attention from the police and we were ready to accept them.

As a side note, several people who had been eating carp livers together at the picnic, including my wife Elaine and Herb Hauptman and Jerry Karl, both Nobel Laureates, woke up next morning with a case of food poisoning. They all recovered.

We left Czechoslovakia by train through Nürnberg, Germany. The entire group of North Americans had spent ten days together on what was for them a severely restricted diet. We literally ran from the Nürnberger train station to an adjacent fruit market that anticipated our precise cravings. The owners had seen the reaction to fresh fruit of other people returning from the east block and had set up their business to serve them. Oranges never tasted so good!

In 1976/77 the Robertson family (myself, Elaine, son and original Bushwakker brewer, Scott, and daughter and current Bushwakker General Manager, Kelly) spent a sabbatical year in Stuttgart, southern Germany. I quickly developed a strong appreciation for German beer and moved from the more familiar styles, like Helles and Vienna, to the full-flavored premium southern German Pilsners. I eventually wrangled an invitation to speak at a University in Prague and this time my palate was ready to enjoy the wonderful traditional beers of Czechoslovakia. I would never go back to Canadian or Blue, except when required to, as a professional beer judge.

When the Robertson family returned from spending a sabbatical year in southern Germany in the summer of 1977, I still remember getting off the plane at the Toronto airport and ordering a beer while waiting for the flight connecting to Regina. I don’t remember which of the standard industrial North American beers it was, but I do remember how it tasted. Basically it didn’t! There was a hint of alcohol, but malt and hop flavour were below the taste detection threshold. I burped and the burp produced the slightest hint of beer flavour. (The air in the burp was warmer than the beer and malt and hop are more easily detected at higher temperatures.) It also was my first realization that perception of beer flavour is highly malleable, and depends on recent experience.

When we left Canada one year earlier, industrial beers were my normal drink. But after becoming acclimatized to the more full-flavoured beers in Europe, I found them wanting. If industrial beer has more flavour at higher temperatures, why do people who drink it try to first get it as cold as possible? One contributing factor may be that they really don’t like beer and if it’s cold enough they wont be able to taste it. But there is an additional reason.

Any distiller knows that alcohol boils at a temperature lower than that at which water boils. That means that as a water/alcohol mixture is warmed, the ratio of alcohol and water in the vapour above the beer tends to move toward an increasing amount of alcohol, and that impacts on the perception of taste. As the beer warms, the alcohol begins to dominate taste and any malt or hop flavour is overwhelmed. However, the more full-flavoured beers have enough malt and hop flavour to keep the alcohol flavour in balance at higher temperatures.

That incident is significant because I immediately decided to not let my taste perception change back to where it had been before leaving Canada, when I had been satisfied with drinking industrial beer. This meant spending the extra money to buy imported beer to meet my beer supply needs. But I soon grew tired of not only paying the extra cost, but also of drinking beer that was either skunky or oxidized or otherwise reflecting its long life in the bottle, just to have access to a full-flavour beer.

It was late 1977 and at that time I ate lunch in the University of Regina Faculty Club, now the University Club. I became involved in conversations over lunch with someone (Alex Kelly, Economics) who had tried a neighbours “home-brew” and in general, he had found the brews to be quite drinkable and varied in flavour. Perhaps I could make beer myself that would meet my needs.

I dropped in at Harvest Brewing at the old address north of the China Doll Restaurant on Broad St. I was surprised to find a large poster on the wall featuring the Neuschwanstein Castle in southern Bavaria. I told the proprietor, Ron Thomsen that I wanted to learn to make beer like they served in that castle on the wall. Stuttgart is only a few hours from Neuschwanstein and we had visited it many times, taking visiting relatives to see it and cross-country skiing in the area around it. (It also served as the inspiration for the Disney castles.)

Ron and I planned my brewing strategy, which involved starting off with extract kits, then adding partial full mash steps to the brewing. In three months I had switched to complete full-mash brewing, which meant that my starting materials were now malted barley, hops, water and yeast, the four classical ingredients allowed by the Rheinheitsgebot, the German purity laws.

Ron talked about starting a home-brewing club. He was aware that other home-brewing supply stores had started brewing clubs as a means to promote increased sales of brewing ingredients and he wanted to try the same. I agreed to participate in any such club and help get it up and running if there were anything that I could do. I think that my only real contribution to the club was to give it a name.

It has been the tradition of brewing clubs to choose names that produce an acronym that is itself a word related to beer. And the Ale and Lager Enthusiasts of Saskatchewan amateur brewing club was born. ALES has now become the second most successful amateur brewing clubs in North America, after the Quality Ale and Fermentation Fraternity (QUAFF) of San Diego California, in terms of awards won per year. Given the lead that Canada and the U. S. have over the rest of the world in serious amateur brewing, this really means that the ALES are also the second best in the world.

I continued brewing and soon encountered a problem familiar to most amateur brewers. The standard brewing volume for amateur brewers is roughly five gallons or 23 liters. That will fill about five dozen standard size beer bottles. If one is sufficiently interested in beer to be actually brewing it, five dozen bottles of beer is probably no more than a three-week supply. If one is also proud of ones beer and offers it to others, cut that down to a two-week supply or less. It takes six to eight hours to produce those five dozen bottles of beer. After a year of brewing, one begins to think about productivity. Is it worth that much time just to have access to good beer?

The obvious solution is to increase the batch size. I gathered new equipment so that I could brew with 70 liter batches. But 70 liters of beer weighs 155 lbs., and it is necessary to move that full volume of open liquid during the brewing process. I needed help.

I recruited my daughter’s husband at the time (since divorced), Keith Wolbaum, who was the technician in my university research group at the time, and is now one of the Bushwakker owners, and a junior research colleague, Dr. Lynn Mihichuk, now head of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Regina.

Wolbaum, Mihichuk, my wife Elaine and I and others had been part of another tradition at the U. of R. For several winters we began the weekend with a hearty trek on cross-country skis, starting at the loading dock of the Laboratory Building, then traveling east on the lake and under the bridge on the Trans-Canada highway, through the grounds of the Wascana Country Club, across Wascana creek to the east side of the Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery, along its northern side to Douglas Park and back across the lake to the starting point. The distance is roughly 10 km.

We made our own trails, and we had a tradition of never canceling our trek because of the weather. After finishing we gathered at a local pizza restaurant for pizza and beer. When skiing hard in stormy weather a cross-country skier in good condition (and I was in good condition back then) can build up a layer of ice across his/her upper back and icicles will hang off his/her toque and his mustache. Our appearance was sometimes strange and from the reaction we got from other patrons at the Pizza restaurant, perhaps a little scary.

Cross-country skiing without prepared trails is known as Bushwacking. We were the original Bushwakkers. (We later changed the spelling for copyright and symmetry reasons.)

Through the winter, starting in late November, four of us gathered every Monday evening to brew roughly the equivalent of 17 dozen bottles of beer. I went home from the university an hour early and started the water heating at 4:00 PM. The rest joined by 6:00 PM. We usually worked until midnight. We often ordered in pizza during the evening.

The Bushwacker Brewers and the ALES amateur brewing club prospered during the 1980’s. Other brewers, or would-be brewers, asked to join us in order to gain experience. We invited two or three aspiring brewers to join us every third Monday evening. We put them to work bottling the beer from three Monday brews, usually 600 bottles. We had purchased a new stove for the kitchen and we re-installed the old stove in the basement. My son-in-law at the time installed a hood and exhaust system over the basement stove.

On winter Monday evenings our home became a brewery, with both stoves being used and up to seven people working in the brewery. My job was to keep records and to schedule the crew’s tasks so that hot water, brewing ingredients and clean vessels were ready when needed.

We decided to give ourselves a name and we chose “The Bushwacker Brewers”, given that most of the core group also cross-country skied together, making our own trails. Over each winter we bottled around 3000 bottles of beer, all in the unattractive but efficient “stubbies”. I built a corner room in the basement, insulated from the rest of the basement, for storage.

The Canadian Amateur Brewing Association (CABA) claimed to be a national organization and its web site listed amateur brewing clubs from across the country. Otherwise it seemed to be a central Canada organization. Nevertheless, we decided to enter some of our beer in its annual competition held in Toronto in 1986. At the time I was a member of an advisory committee of the CBC on science and technology content. (Other members included David Suzuki and Vaira Vikis-Freibergs, who was the president of Latvia from 1999 until 2007)

The committee met in Toronto and I was able combine a trip to a committee meeting with the annual CABA competition. I was present when it was announced that our Palliser Porter had taken gold in the best of show category. I was “flabbergasted”. Nevertheless that gave us confidence later when we decided to “go commercial.”
The two-handled beer mug over the bar marks that occasion. Other mugs over the bar are also for awards won at CABA competitions.

In the late 1980’s the ALES began to run out of steam. Ron Thomsen set up other home-brew supply stores in western Canada and operated out of Saskatoon. His Regina managers were not as supportive of the club as had been Ron himself. At the same time the work of creating our own beer supply was becoming less exciting and more like real work. We were brewing over three times as much beer as I had brewed while working alone, but we had four times as many people to share it. We hadn’t really increased our productivity, but group brewing is certainly more enjoyable than working alone.

How do we maintain access to real beer without so much work? The obvious answer was to go commercial. We were just beginning to learn about brewpubs and microbreweries at that time. Spinnakers had opened in Victoria in 1984 and the Kingston Brewpub in Ontario in 1985. At the time I was chairman of the Saskatchewan Health Research Board and I had access to the provincial cabinet. I started lobbying key cabinet members to create the legislative framework for brewpubs in Saskatchewan.

The key issue was to find a way around “tied-house” legislation. Up until the days of prohibition in the U. S., many licensed establishments and nearly all drinking establishments in most parts of the world, were owned and operated by breweries. They were called “tied houses”. (Independent licensees were called “free houses”, the name we gave our other restaurants; see www.thefreehouse.com.) This tended to limit the choices of beer available to the customer, but the bigger problem was that the big breweries competed for market share by pushing consumption in their own establishments, encouraging what we now call politely “over-consumption”.

Prohibition was one response. The other was tied-house legislation. A brewpub contravenes tied-house legislation by definition. According to the American Brewing Association; a brewpub is a “A restaurant that has an in-house brewery”. (No, not “A pub that has an in-house brewery”. The average American brewpub and The Bushwakker see more sales out of the kitchen than from the bar.)

The provinces and states found various ways around tied-house regulations. Saskatchewan regulations provide that a restaurant or pub may brew its own beer if its total annual production does not exceed a proscribed limit. Alberta regulations say that every brewery may operate one restaurant and no more.

The campaign for the 1986 election was just beginning and my cabinet contacts didn’t want to bring up any issue involving alcohol during the campaign, but they promised to address my ideas immediately after getting re-elected, which they did.

In anticipation of being offered the chance to open a brewpub in Regina I started preparations. I attended meetings of the Craft Brewers Association. The first was in Milwaukee. Less than 200 people attended, but it was there that I met Brad McQuhae, who at the time was the brewer at Spinnakers in Victoria and who continues to be an important contact for us in the industry. Attendance at craft brewing meetings now exceed 3000.

I sought business advice on starting a brewpub from a Regina business consultant and met with him several times. When the Saskatchewan government did eventually start working on brewpub regulations, that same consultant was engaged to advise the provincial government with regard the creation of new brewpub regulations.

I eagerly awaited the announcement of the regulations, while looking for opportunities to raise the financing. Reality descended and I learned that it would take a lot more money than I had hoped, and had available, to start up a serious business.

Rumours circulated about the expected content of the new regulations. I was out of the province for two weeks attending scientific conferences. I returned and was told that the new regulations would contain a provision that would allow brewpubs to join with hotels in operating cold beer stores. At first I was delighted. Our brewpub would have a secondary source of income.

Then I learned that the beer to be sold in these brewpub beer stores was conventional mass market beer, not the brewpub’s own beer. At first I didn’t believe it. It made no sense that a business dedicated to the sale and promotion of high quality serious beer would want to sully its image by being associated with “industrial beer”, as I came to label the mass-market North American product. It became clear that in my conversations with the consultant I had not adequately conveyed the idea that brewpub and microbreweries were popular because they offered an alternative to the blandness and sameness of industrial beer.

In its first term the conservative government had promoted a number of business initiatives, contrary to conventional conservative ideas about the direct involvement of governments in business, and most of their initiatives had been failures. The newly elected government wanted to give brewpubs a “leg up” by cutting them a share of the cold-beer market. I tried to explain that giving a brewpub a license to sell industrial beer was the equivalent to giving an anti-abortion group a license to operate an abortion clinic to raise money for its lobby efforts. And anyway, North American industrial beer was an abortion to anyone who had become accustomed to drinking the more full-flavoured beers available in most of continental Europe.

I made no headway.

However, I suddenly started to receive phone calls from others with a new interest in the brewpub concept. Meetings were arranged. The conversations went something like:

Caller: “We’re interested in the new regulations that allow brewpubs in Saskatchewan and we hear that you know something about brewpubs.”
BR: “Yes”
Caller: “Okay, we could use some help. We want to set up the bar and the off-sale, and we would like for you to join us and help us set up the brewery.”
(To the person not from the prairie region of Canada or the northern tier states, “off-sale” is the local phrase for “retail beer store”, beer sold for consumption off premise.”)
BR: “And what do you have in mind for a brewery?”
Caller: “We’ve already agreed to purchase a malt extract system.”
BR: “But malt-extract systems produce poor quality beer and the ingredient cost is high. The industry has already established that full-mash breweries are much better investments.”
Caller: “That’s okay. We don’t intend to sell much beer. We see the off-sale as the source of profit!”

I declined to participate.

The hotels in Saskatchewan held the monopoly on the sale of cold beer, outside the monopoly of the government liquor stores for warm beer sales. The hotels would not give up their control without a fight. A fierce lobby against the whole concept of brewpubs was launched by the Saskatchewan Hotel Association. A compromise was reached. Only four-brewpub “endorsements” would be allowed, with two each in Regina and Saskatoon. Those who wanted those endorsements would compete for them.

I joined the fray.

I lost.

In retrospect two things became obvious.
The first four brewpubs made token attempts to produce drinkable beer, but on average their brewers did not have the right backgrounds to be able to learn to make brewpub quality beer and they brewed beer that few drank. The owners used the brewpub regulations to operate lounges and beer stores. The alternative was to build a hotel to gain access to the same privileges and a small brewery was cheaper than hotel rooms. The hotels were justified in their opposition to the introduction of brewpub regulations.

From our perspective, the ersatz brewpubs gave the whole concept of brewpub a bad reputation in Saskatchewan, and we’re still dealing with that bad reputation 20 years later.

Secondly, if we had been given a brewpub “endorsement” then, we would have almost certainly failed. When we did get to proceed with the development of the Bushwakker five years later, we just made it through the first year. We were short on business knowledge and experience. Without what we learned in those five intervening years we would not have had enough knowledge to survive the first year.

We did eventually manage to find the money to build The Bushwakker, and it opened its doors in January 1991. We struggled for the first few years, but we gradually learned the things we needed to know about operating a restaurant and brewery from the school of hard knocks, and we survived, then grew, then prospered. In addition to basic business knowledge, I brought my experience from managing a university research group and Elaine brought her background in educational psychology. Popular books on the “new styles of management” at the time we were getting established recommended what we were already doing.

Our success and our reputation grew. People came to us for help with their own new businesses in the hospitality industry and they still do. We agreed to assist a group headed by Regina’s well-known restaurateur, Fred Soofi, in creating a pub environment to serve people living in Regina’s Cathedral District. That led to the development of what is now known as the Freehouse Restaurant Group.

We re-established the Ale and Lager Enthusiasts of Saskatchewan and they have moved on to fame and fortune, at least as measured by reputation. The ALES and Bushwakker together host the annual Canadian Amateur Brewing Competition, which is itself the gateway to international competitions for Canadian amateur brewers. ALES wins more awards than any other Canadian amateur brewing club and the second greatest number for any club in North America.

The City of Regina asked us to create a Business Improvement District in the area in which we operate. Regina’s Old Warehouse Business Improvement District (ROWBID) now promotes new businesses around the Bushwakker, bringing us new customers.

In 1997 I took early retirement from the University of Regina to devote full time to the Bushwakker and Freehouse restaurant groups. Our son and head brewer, Scott, was seconded several times, by our friend Brad McQuhae, to set up breweries and train brewers for craft breweries in Japan. In 1998 he was hired away from us by a group in Singapore, who had seen his work in Japan. We have been fortunate in finding strong replacements for the position of head brewer since then.

The Singapore group continues to expand. They are now putting a brewpub into Changi Airport’s new Terminal 3 in Singapore. Elaine is now general manager emeritus of the Bushwakker and our daughter Kelly is the new GM. One of our granddaughters works part time in the office. (We have, on occasion seen three generations of the family working behind the bar during a particularly busy Friday lunch, when everyone joins the fray.)

We have received numerous awards for our beer, for the creation of ROWBID and for our generation and promotion of a Jazz culture and Jazz bands in Regina. Our serving team regularly wins the gold medal in the reader’s poll conducted by the Prairie Dog magazine, and head server Cheryl wins or ties for the title of top server every year. (Last year she tied with fellow Bushwakker server Jody) Last year we received a total of six reader’s-poll gold medals in the Prairie Dog annual reader’s vote. We have been named in several compilations of top Canadian craft breweries.

The Bushwakker has been featured on national radio and television programs. (CTV’s segment on our Blackberry Mead and our Firkin Taping ceremony was aired nationally several times over the Christmas period, 2006.) This is being written in a hotel room in Stockholm, where our beer is representing Canadian craft beer at the Stockholm Beer and Whisky Festival, at the request of the Government of Canada.

Our annual single malt scotch tasting event, our annual lobster dinner, our annual Chilean night, our annual brewer’s dinner, our specialty beer tastings, all sell out weeks in advance. Our newly introduced Mexican Night, featuring a tasting of 100% Agave Tequilas, will do so soon.

Based on our continued strong sales growth we expect to be around for a long time.

Bushwakker Kitchen

The Bushwakker Brewpub kitchen has a set menu, seasonal specials and daily specials. Several dishes on the Bushwakker menu are made with the finest fresh Bushwakker beer. The Bushwakker philosophy that it must offer the very best, and that means everything possible must be prepared to the highest standards by Bushwakker staff within the Bushwakker, not only applies to the brewery, it also applies to the kitchen. Bushwakker kitchen staff arrive every workday morning by 7:00am, preparing meals for the day from basic ingredients. That is why Bushwakker fish and chips, nachos, hamburgers, fries and many other dishes are known to local customers to be simply the best you can get anywhere!

The Bushwakker hosts a spring Brewer's Dinner each year in conjunction with the local homebrewing club, the ALES (Ale and Lager Enthusiasts of Saskatchewan). A Brewer's Dinner is a multi-course meal in which every dish is prepared with beer and served with another beer. Each beer is chosen from a style that enhances the flavour and enjoyment of the dish

Access a PDF copy of the Bushwakker menu

Access a PDF copy of the Wakker Weekly to see this weeks specials.

This Weeks Daily Specials

Our weekend Seafood Feature is Smoked Salmon Salad w/ Hemp Seed Citrus Vinaigrette. $15.95

Soup & Sandwich Special is $11.95.  All hot specials are $15.95, except where noted, and include a serving of soup du jour, chopped, or Caesar salad. 

 

Soup

Sandwich

Dinner

Fri., July 25

Creamy Tomato

Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato & Smoked Salmon Croissant

Chili Garlic 10oz Ribeye w/ Stirfry veg & Dashi Noodles. $17.95

Sat., July 26

Bushwakker

Burger & a Pint. $15.95

Steak & a Pint. $17.95

Mon., July 28

Tomato Vegetable Noodle

Grilled Cheese w/ Tomato & Bacon

Roast Tomato Chipotle & Sausage Linguini

Tues., July 29

Sausage & Bean

BBQ Chicken Pizza. $13.95

Pork Stroganoff

Wed., July 30

Chili Beef w/ Crispy Tortillas

Beef Tort Wrap

Ginger & Cucumber Mushroom Roman Noodle Bowl

Thur., July 31

Orange Pork & Chickpea

Jerk Chicken Wrap w/ Mango Chutney

Yellow Chicken Curry

Fri., August 1

Creamy Chicken Dill

Jumbo Egg Salad Wrap

Shrimp & Chicken Stuffed Beef Tenderloin w/ Apple Albafuro Sauce, Roast Zucchini & Fried Potatoes. $18.95

Sat., August 2

Bushwakker

Ham & Cheese Potato Pie

Steak & a Pint. $17.95

2014 Events Overview

The Bushwakker offers a wide variety of special events. Some are aimed at supporting various community cultural and charitable organizations. Others are intended to help patrons become familiar with food and beverage products that may interest them, like single malt scotches, classic beer styles, beer related cuisine and ethnic cuisine. Events are usually intended for both the beer connoisseur and the neophyte.

The Wakker Weekly Online

Events are also listed in The Bushwakker weekly newsletter, the Wakker Weekly. The Wakker Weekly is available by email and is available in hard copy at the counter at the Bushwakker entrance. It is also posted in this website. To subscribe, email stating your name and email address.

For reservations or tickets to an event please call 306 359-7276 or e-mail bar@bushwakker.com

Special Menu Nights

Mondays

  • Wings & a Pint - $13.95 from 4:30 to 11:00 PM. 
  • Monday Night Jazz & Blues at 8:00 PM.

Tuesdays

  • Pizza & a Pint - $15.95 from 4:30 to 11:00 PM.

Wednesdays

  • Wings & a Pint - $13.95 from 4:30 to 11:00 PM.
  • Wednesday Night Folk begins at 9:00 PM.

Thursdays

  • Super Import Beer Night - one of the largest selections in town.
Fridays
  • The Classic Friday Happy Hour - 4:30 to 6:30 PM.

Saturdays

  • Steak & a Pint - $16.95 from 11:00 AM to midnight.

Firkin Fridays

  • First Firkin Friday on the first Friday of every month at 5:30 PM.

Bushwakker Regular Events Calendar

Monday Night Jazz & Blues - Live every Monday night

The diversity of the local music scene is showcased every Monday night from 8:00PM to 10:30PM. Enjoy live jazz and blues acts in Regina's only regular live jazz & blues venue. Free admission.

Wednesday Night Folk - Live every Wednesday night

Folk music isn't limited to an acoustic guitar, a lone voice and a campfire anymore. Enjoy local and touring solo artists, duos and bands playing a variety of musical genres from roots, blues, alt-country to Celtic. 9:00PM to 11:00PM. Free admission.

First Firkin Friday: The first Friday happy hour each month

Experience the ceremony as a small keg (firkin) of fresh ale is paraded through the pub lead by a piper. A volunteer is selected to drive a tap into the firkin with a handmade wooden maul affectionately named, "The Firkin Wakker". Incredible beer flavour unlike anything else. The volunteer tapper and the spectators within a 20 foot radius are soaked with squirting beer. Will you be the next person chosen to tap the First Friday Firkin? 5:30pm

Science Pub: The third Thursday of every month at 7:00 PM

One manifestation of the new cool image of science is the emergence of the science pub; lectures on scientific topics of general interest, in a pub setting, over beer and snacks. The Bushwakker and The University of Regina present the Science Pub Series. Seating is limited to 50 persons. All lectures are held in the Bushwakker Arizona Room private banquet area. The room opens at 5:00 PM. Many people come down for dinner at that time so that they can ensure they get a seat. Suds and science has proven to be very popular indeed! Please note that Science Pub lectures are not offered in December, February, June, July and August.

Connoisseur Beer Tasting Series - various times throughout the year

Special beer tasting theme nights are held in The Bushwakker Arizona Room periodically throughout year. Generally eight to ten specialty imported beers are discussed and evaluated in each session. Some previous themes include: The Beers of Belgium, Beer and Cheese Pairing, Stouts and Porters, India Pale Ales, Abbey vs. Trappist Ales, The World of Wheat Beers, Understanding Lambics, Imperial Stouts, Imperial IPAs and Big, Bad, Barleywines!

Every Saskatchewan Roughrider Homegame!!

Meet at the Bushwakker before and after the game. Burger & a Pint special themed on every Green & White opponent. Go Riders go!

Bushwakker Special Events Calendar

The Bushwakker 23rd Anniversary/Robbie Burns 255th Birthday – Jan. 25, 2014

Celebrating over two decades of fines brews and great food! The enthusiasm of our many Bushwakker devotees reaches its peak as our pub is always at capacity for this annual celebration. Free haggis, neeps and birthday cake, a Bushwakker trivia quiz, fantastic prizes, and a presentation of Robbie Burns' songs and poems with a brief "life and times" overview by Saskatchewan playwright, Ken Mitchell. Enjoy performances from The Fraser Pipe Band, The Regina Highland Dancing Association and a Celtic music performance from The Tilted Kilts that will fill the dance floor. Shake those January blahs and join the birthday party celebrating both The Bushwakker Brewpub and Scotland`s favourite son!

Archives Week: Looking Back at The Grey Cup 1951, 1966 & 1989 – Feb. 5, 2014

Presented by the Saskatchewan Archives Board as part of Archives Week. Hosted by Craig Lederhouse of CBC. Celebrity readers include: Jeff Corbett, Al Ford, Ron Vanstone, Barb Pacholik and Tom Shepherd. This two hour event begins at 7:00 PM.

Saturday Afternoon Blues Showcase – Mar. 1, 2014

Presented in conjunction with The Regina Delta Blues Association and The Mid-Winter Blues Festival Week, our Saturday afternoon showcase is a great way to warm up for the festival finale later that evening. Enjoy great local blues acts on the Bushwakker stage from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM. Hosted by Jeff ``Redbeard` Corbett of 91.3FM CJTR. Be sure to try a slice of Redbeard`s signature chocolate cheesecake too! We will also be presenting live blues music on the Monday and Wednesday evening earlier that week.

St. Patrick's Day Celebration – March 17, 2014

The annual Irish celebration falls on a Monday this year! The Guinness will be cascading, the bartender's fingers will be stained green from concocting Shamrock Lagers, the Irish food features will be delicious, Bushwakker head brewer, Mitch Dalrymple will create a delicious firkin of Irish coffee stout and everyone will be dancing to the great live Celtic music of The Tilted Kilts. $5 cover charge.

The Sask Sampler – March 22, 2014

The biggest Bushwakker Folk Night of the year! Up-and-coming folk artists from across the province strut their stuff are vying for a spot on the Regina Folk Festival, Ness Creek Music Festival, Wood Mountain Festival and Gateway Music Festival stages. It`s not Folk Band Warz but it is a great night of Saskatchewan musical talent.

Annual Brewer's Dinner – April 12, 2014

It is the defining theme of The Bushwakker to provide delicious beer and delicious food. This evening truly reflects what we are all about. Enjoy a fabulous multi-course meal in which each course is prepared with a unique beer style and complemented with a different beer for drinking to enhance the flavours of each dish. Cutting-edge beer cuisine awaits!

Redbeard's Annual Aries Birthday Bash – Apr. 14, 2014

Loveable Jeff 'Redbeard' Corbett of 91.2FM CJTR is not only Regina`s number one live music fan but he is also celebrating a birthday. Being the generous soul that he is, he wishes to celebrate his special day with all those who share his zodiac – Aries. Things get underway with the tapping of a special firkin of Redbeard`s Red Ale followed by live performances from some of Regina`s most talented musicians. Be sure to try a slice of Redbeard`s chocolate birthday cheesecake. All zodiac signs welcome!

May Long Weekend Keg Event – May 16 & 17, 2014

The official kick-off to another long-awaited Saskatchewan summer begins at The Bushwakker. With any one of our four sizes of Bushwakker kegs purchased this weekend you will received free ice, cups, coasters and the use of a keg chiller tub.

12th Annual Soul Sisters Dinner and Concert – May 29, 2014

This annual YWCA fundraiser is once again presented by The Room. Browse the incredible array of items in the huge silent auction. Tickets available from The Room and the YWCA.

A Celtic Hallowe'en – October 31, 2014

Live music with one of Regina's most talented Celtic bands, The Tilted Kilts. Our Great Pumpkin Spiced Brown Ale will be on tap. Be sure to come dressed for the occasion and enter our Hallowe'en Costume Contest for a chance to win one of our most excellent Bushwakker prizes. The grand prize will be a $100 Bushwakker gift card! $5 cover charge in effect.

Single Malt Scotch Tasting – Saturday, November 29, 2014

One of our most popular events of the year! The featured scotches will be presented in six flights with product description and commentary from hosts, Grant Frew and Jamie Singer. Entertainment for the evening includes live performances from The Fraser Pipe Band and The Regina Highland Dancing Association. A special Scottish-themed dinner will be available as an optional dinner choice prior to the tasting event that evening. A selection of door prizes will be given away. Tickets will be available in late October. Don't delay, they sell out fast!

Blackberry Mead Release – the first Saturday of each December (December 6, 2014)

We spend all year making this Lumsden Valley honey nectar infused with juicy blackberries. Something this special takes quite a bit of time to ferment and mature. The result is an exotic elixir unlike any other. Folks began lining up shortly after midnight. Some bring lawn chairs, some bring patio heaters, some bring sleeping bags, some bring heated tents and ice fishing huts, some even bring BBQs and make bacon and eggs! Bushwakker head brewer, Mitch Dalrymple always brings out cups of hot chocolate to those in line. We open our doors at 11:00 AM and in 100 minutes over 6000 bottles are snapped up by the legion of devoted Bushwakker Blackberry Mead fans. The supply of mead on tap usually last until the new year if we're lucky. This date marks the true kick-off to the Bushwakker holiday season.

Nothing For New Year's 9 – December 31, 2014

We gave you a simple formulated event and you loved it. No noise makers, no escalated drink prices, no cover charge, no midnight champagne, no dancing, no line-ups, no hassle, no problem. Come spend a relaxing evening at the good 'ol Bushwakker as we welcome 2015. Perhaps try chef Mike's special prime rib and jumbo Yorkshire pudding New Year's Eve dinner. What a meal to finish off the year!

For reservations or tickets to an event please call 306 359-7276 or e-mail bar@bushwakker.com

Bushwakker's Private Function Rooms

In response to growing demand the Bushwakker Brewpub has recently expanded its seating capacity by 20%. The additional space can also be booked for private functions. It is in the front of the Strathdee Building and the room has three large external windows, much like a sun room. The windows are filled with a variety of attractive live plants that enhance the natural ambiance of the room. Such rooms are common in the state of Arizona where many Regina residents spend part of the winter. That is why we have named it the Arizona Room.

Arizona Room

The room may be booked in various formats, as is, with access to HD TV, with access to projection facilities for Power Point presentations, and for HD Videoconferencing, and a board table that can be configured for up to 20 people. We also offer a special business meeting luncheon menu.

Videoconferencing is becoming increasingly popular as users discover that the interaction through HD VC is similar to the interaction between people in the same room, but without the cost and time for people to travel to a common location. If you can’t justify the cost of your own VC system, or would like to find out how effective it is, why not give it a try at the Bushwakker!


The Bushwakker Clubroom

The Bushwakker has a second private room downstairs right in the brewery, overlooking the beer cellars. Call 359 7276 to book either private meeting room, with service.

Blackberry Mead

Blackberry Mead Release – the first Saturday of each December (December 6, 2014). We spend all year making this Lumsden Valley honey nectar infused with pureed blackberries. Something this special takes quite a bit of time to ferment and mature. The result is an exotic elixir unlike any other. Folks began lining up shortly after midnight. Some bring lawn chairs, some bring patio heaters, some bring sleeping bags, some bring heated tents and ice fishing huts, some even bring BBQs and make bacon and eggs! Bushwakker head brewer, Mitch Dalrymple always brings out cups of hot chocolate to those in line. We open our doors at 11:00 AM and in less than two hours over 6000 bottles are snapped up by the legion of devoted Bushwakker Blackberry Mead fans. The supply of mead on tap usually lasts into the new year. This date marks the true kick-off to the Bushwakker holiday season.

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Bushwakker's Brewery

The brewery components were built by Specific Mechanical and installed by Newlands Services International. It includes a two vessel brewhouse and four fermenters, all ten hectolitre capacity. The beer cellars contain 25 Grundy tanks (8.2 hl) and five 18 hl tanks for conditioning, lagering and dispensing.

Two Row Pale Malt is obtained from Prairie Malt of Biggar, Saskatchewan, specialty malts from Shreier (Wisconsin), Cargil (USA), Simpson's (UK), Dingeman's (Belgium), and Gambrinus (BC), Weyermann (Germany), & Hugh Baird's (UK) are purchased through Infraready Products in Saskatoon. Hops are purchased from Hop Union in Washington State and Freshops in Oregon. Bushwakker ales typically take 35 days between the brewhouse and the tap. Lagers typically take 60-90 days for the journey.

The Bushwakker Brewpub offers nine flagship beers, two guest draughts and one rotating tap of special import draught all year round. Twenty additional beers and a blackberry mead are brewed in The Bushwakker brewery and made seasonally available. They are served on a rotating basis, or at certain times of the year, or at the dictates of consumer demand.

See the specifics of all Bushwakker brewed beers.

OG, or Original Gravity, refers to the density of the liquid before fermentation. Water has a gravity of 1000. When organic material is added to water, its gravity increases. If more malt is used, the OG will be higher and the beer will be "stronger".

Head Brewer Mitch Dalrymple

Our head brewer, Mitch Dalrymple, had the good fortune of discovering the pleasures of finely crafted beer in the late 1980's. He was immediately smitten with the wonderful new flavours and aromas and took up home brewing. In the late 1990's he was able to convince the Bushwakker’s head brewer at the time, Brant Ross, that he would make an excellent assistant. Later, an opportunity to brew for the Brewsters Brewing Co. came along and he had to say goodbye to all the wonderful people at the Bushwakker who had treated him so well over the years. When the most recent head brewer at the Bushwakker, David Rudge, decided to up stakes and move back to Winnipeg, Mitch made his way back to us. He completed a brewing course through the Seibel Institute in Chicago, to enhance his background brewing knowledge. Mitch adds that "It feels great to be back home."

E-mail Mitch: beer@bushwakker.com


The Bushwakker Management Team

Bev Robertson

The Robertson family spent the year 1976/1977 in Stuttgart, Germany while Bev was on sabbatical at the Universitat der Stuttgart. When the family returned home Bev decided that domestic North American beer was no longer acceptable. He took up home brewing and his efforts soon evolved into the Bushwakker Homebrewers. The Bushwakker Homebrewers consisted of a few individuals who produced roughly 250 imperial gallons of beer over each winter, for their own use. Their beers won several prizes, such as best Continental Dark/MÞnchener Dunkel in the 1985 Great Canadian Homebrew Competition for Arctic Dark. In 1985 Palliser Porter took Best in Show at the Great Canadian Homebrew Competition, Best Porter at the American Homebrewers Association competition and the Cape Cod Brewers Award.

Eventually, they began to tire and Bev decided to "go commercial" in 1986. He was able to convince the government of the day to pass enabling legislation to make Saskatchewan one of the earliest Canadian provinces to allow brewpubs. The Bushwakker received its license in 1990 and opened its doors in early 1991. As Chairman of the Board, Bev handles issues with government agencies, banks and shareholders.

E-mail Bev at: info@bushwakker.com


Elaine Robertson

Elaine Robertson is The Bushwakker's General Manager Emeritus. Elaine continues to assist in making things run smoothly at The Bushwakker, for both staff and customers. She can still sling a mean pint while keeping her eye on everything happening on the floor of The Bushwakker. That means that if a server has not noticed a new customer, Elaine will get a server to that customer quickly. Elaine grew up in the small town of Keswick, New Brunswick. She has a background in Sociology and Special Education and worked for a time as a teacher. She has given presentations on Brewpub Management at international brewpub meetings. The Bushwakker is a family business and three generations of Robertson's may be found on any day working at The Bushwakker.

E-mail Elaine at: elaine@bushwakker.com


Kelly Monette

Kelly Monette is the Bushwakker General Manager. She also serves as the bookkeeper, office manager, pastry chef, general problem solver and last resort at the Bushwakker. If you have questions about the unique services that The Bushwakker can provide, (special events, catering, baked goods to go, etc.) call Kelly (306 359 7276). Similarly if you wish to approach us about any unique service or product that you want to provide to the Bushwakker, call Kelly.

mail Kelly at: kelly@bushwakker.com





Mike Monette

Journeyman Bushwakker Executive Chef, Mike Monette began his career in the culinary field over 30 years ago as a dishwasher in a small downtown Regina country western venue called Sheila Anne's. His passion for the food service industry was apparent and he quickly began assuming positions of greater responsibility at The Landmark Inn and The Vagabond. He then moved on to a sous chef and acting executive chef position at The Hotel Saskatchewan. He then worked as the executive chef at The Bushwakker before returning to his home province of British Columbia for a short time. When Mike returned to Saskatchewan he was the sous chef at The Conexus Arts Centre before returning to The Bushwakker to ask for the hand of the owner's daughter, regain his status as Bushwakker Executive Chef and create a menu and professional kitchen atmosphere which has greatly contributed to The Bushwakker receiving the accolade as being one of Canada's best brewpubs by The Globe and Mail. Mike still snickers when his Lions thump The Riders.


Mitch Dalrymple

Our Head Brewer, Mitch Dalrymple, had the good fortune of discovering the pleasures of finely crafted beer in the late 1980's. He was immediately smitten with the wonderful new flavours and aromas and took up home brewing. In the late 1990's he was able to convince the Bushwakker’s head brewer at the time, Brant Ross, that he would make an excellent assistant. Later, an opportunity to brew for the Brewsters Brewing Co. came along and he had to say goodbye to all the wonderful people at the Bushwakker who had treated him so well over the years. When the most recent head brewer at the Bushwakker, David Rudge, decided to up stakes and move back to Winnipeg, Mitch made his way back to us. He completed a brewing course through the Seibel Institute in Chicago, to enhance his background brewing knowledge. Mitch adds that "It feels great to be back home."

E-mail Mitch at: beer@bushwakker.com


Grant Frew

Bar Manager Grant Frew became a member of the Bushwakker team just a few months after the Bushwakker opened in 1991. He completed a bartending course at the age of 18, before he had reached the Saskatchewan legal drinking age. He worked in a number of positions before arriving at the Bushwakker, including head bartender in a large nightclub/dinner theatre, and in a English-style pub featuring a strong imported beer list. In addition to his work behind the bar, Grant is also the person who puts together all of the special events at the Bushwakker, from jazz nights to single malt scotch tastings. He is also responsible for marketing. He was named Regina's top bartender in 1999 and 2003. He has also received training as a brewer in The Bushwakker brewery. Like many members of the Bushwakker team, Grant takes great pride in being part of what is widely recognized as one of North America's top brewpubs.

E-mail Grant at: bar@bushwakker.com


Cheryl Tovey

Cheryl came to the Bushwakker in the Spring of 1992, just a few months after it opened. Serving is her choice profession and she does it professionally! Readers of Regina's entertainment and hospitality weekly, The Prairie Dog, have voted her “Best Regina Server” for each of the past five years.

As Floor Manager, Cheryl trains new servers at the Bushwakker, schedules their shifts and watches over all the tables to catch and correct any oversights. She also fills in wherever needed, as bartender, hostess, light office worker or table re-arranger. She helps coordinate the many special events at the Bushwakker, takes bookings, arranges seating, and oversees the hosting and seating of the events.

Cheryl loves her work and it shows. She has confidence that every item from the brewery, the bar and the kitchen at the Bushwakker will be absolutely top notch! It is always her goal to see that every Bushwakker customer is a satisfied customer. Cheryl is responsible for the addition of the blond ale to our in-house beer list. She worked with head brewer at the time, David Rudge, to formulate the beer and it is appropriately named “Cheryl's Blond Ale”. It's formulation has since been fine-tuned by current brewer Mitch Dalrymple.

Fans of Cheryl and Cheryl's Blond Ale can show their support by purchasing her T-shirt, featuring the new Cheryl's Blond Ale logo.

E-mail Cheryl at: cheryl@bushwakker.com

Wakker Events

Before 1912 the corner of Cornwall and Dewdney was occupied by a Chinese Laundry. We don’t know how big it was and how much of the space that is now the Strathdee building was used for the laundry. It was destroyed by the great cyclone of 1912, which was, in fact, a tornado. Dozens were trapped in the rubble of the buildings that were torn apart by the tornado. The Ackerman building across the street was only partly damaged, as you can see in the pictures on our west wall. In true Regina tradition, hundreds came to the warehouse area to free those trapped. British actor William Henry Pratt was appearing in a play in Regina at the time of the storm. In the aftermath, he volunteered as a rescue worker. Years later, he would move to Hollywood and change his name to Boris Karloff. In the 1960s, Karloff appeared on the talk and game show Front Page Challenge where he was featured not because of his notoriety in horror films, but because of his involvement in the Regina Cyclone of 1912.

The man who is responsible for the creation of the Strathdee building was named Stewart. He planned the biggest and handsomest warehouse building in Regina. It was to be the Cadillac among warehouses, and it still is. It was built in 1913 and 1914 and opened in the spring of 1914. He brought young James Strathdee from Winnipeg to manage it.  

Railway cars would be unloaded at the rear, on tracks that ran next to the building. An army of workers moved goods to the six large floors for storage (before the days of palate jacks.) Owners of the many small country stores came to the area under the tin ceiling to look over the goods for sale; cloth, flower, dried beans, etc., and make their orders which were hauled away in trucks from loading docks on the east side of the building.>

James and his wife lived in the Cathedral area and was a member of Regina’s “elite”, as the manager of the Stewart-Strathdee building. As business expanded a new Scot, named Campbell, was brought from Winnipeg to be assistant manager. It was now the Stewart-Strathdee-Campbell building.

In the early 1930’s, James Strathdee was returning from Calgary by motor vehicle. Somewhere near Swift Current he was involved in a major auto accident. He sustained serious injuries, including head injuries. He recovered, but he was never himself. Because of his diminished capacity, he began to loose authority to his assistant, Campbell. He became more and more depressed. He was found one October morning in the late 1930’s lying on the tracks across the street with his head nearly blown off and a shotgun lay nearby.

The police called it suicide, but many questions remain unanswered. Why did he choose such an unlikely place and time to do himself in?
Campbell took over. Eventually the patterns of distribution changed and the role of the great warehouse declined. It became an Eaton’s warehouse. Then part of the building was used for offices and storage by the Saskatchewan Liquor Board. Then it became Regina Modern Furniture, and then the Strathdee Mall and the Bushwakker Brewpub. Now it is a mixture of residential condominiums, offices, shops and The Bushwakker.

In recent years people working in the building have begun reporting strange events, At night people claim that they have seen a man with a full beard and 1930’s clothing. He is usually seen “out of the corner of the eye”, late at night. Others claim to experience a sudden chilling draught. One of the most definitive stories is told by Wes. He had his own bakery on the second floor upstairs. He has since worked at the Bushwakker and at the Free House. He says that one night at 3:00 AM a man with a beard and a brown plaid shirt walked past him. He saw the man not directly in front of him, but not “out of the corner of his eye.” Wes put down his work and turned to have a better look, but no one was there.

Those who claim to have seen the apparition assume that it is James Strathdee. They have come to refer to the ghost as “Jim”

One person who refused to accept the possibility that there really is a Jim wandering the building at night was an antique dealer on the third floor named Dave. Dave was working late one night. He finished, turned out the lights, and went to the stairwell. The third floor shops are made secure by closing and locking a big wrought-iron gate. Dave locked the gate and turned off the last light. He then noticed that he had missed a small three-position light that he could still see glowing faintly at the far end of the floor. He said out loud to no one in particular “Darn! Hey Jim, can you turn out that light for me?” Before he could turn to leave the light went from low to medium. He froze. It then went to high, and then off!

One of our line cooks claims to have seen Jim in the Bushwakker area and the brewers report strange draughts. There has been an unusual incident. The boiler that fires our brewhouse is in a room at the north-east corner of the cellar, together with the big boiler that heats the building. Our brewer claims that he went into the boiler room late one afternoon to work on our boiler. He says that the room was locked, empty and in complete darkness until he turned on the light. While he was working, a piece of coal came sailing out of the darkness above the big boiler and bounced off the side of a pail next to him. It happened twice and he decided to leave.

As it happens, our house electrician was working the same day over the boiler and had found some ancient pieces of coal on the top of it. He decided to throw some pieces down into a pail he had noticed below, so he could take them home to show his son. So, either Jim was copying the electrician or the brewer did not find the door locked shut before he entered the room, as he swears was indeed the case.

Jim’s name is Celtic and means “valley of the Dee”, a river that runs from the central highlands to Aberdeen, Scotland. Occupants of the Strathdee Building think that Jim is a reasonably satisfied ghost. He seems to be downright helpful. Perhaps that is because his building often reflects his heritage, with lots of Celtic and Scottish events at the Bushwakker. For instance, the Bushwakker’s next Single Malt Scotch Tasting takes place in late October, with six single malts, a pipe and drum band, highland dancers, and Celtic musicians.

Bev Robertson

Feb 2014 First Firkin

Posted on: 22-May-2014

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be The Bushwakker Firkin?

Ghosts in Regina

Posted on: 08-May-2014

A documentary of the various ghosts that inhabit buildings and locations around Regina, Featuring Bushwakkers own Strathdee Ghost!

Mead Secret

Posted on: 06-Dec-2013

Check out this video we made detailing this years new labels and the top-secret mead room

Mead Taste Test

Posted on: 22-May-2014

Ever wonder how our Bushwakker Blackberry Mead stacks up to other meads that are locally available? Check out this fun comparison conducted by Dr. Booze in Saskatoon

Mead!

Posted on: 14-Nov-2013

Getting ready for the 2013 Mead Release!

Scotch!

Posted on: 22-May-2014

Grant went down to the Global Morning News studio to talk about tomorrow's Scotch Tasting, check it out!

MEET OUR GHOST

Before 1912 the corner of the Cornwall and Dewdney was occupied by a Chinese Laundry... MORE ABOUT OUR GHOST

WAKKER STAFF

BLACKBERRY MEAD

Blackberry Mead Release – the first Saturday of each December (December 6, 2014). We spend all year making this Lumsden Valley honey nectar infused with pureed blackberries... Read More

ANNUAL BLACKBERRY MEAD RELEASE COUNTDOWN CLOCK

REDBEARD RADIO

CJTR'S Jeff Corbett (Redbeard) helped Bushwakker compile a playlist strictly made up of Saskatchewan music. Lorena Kelly of SaskMusic helped with licensing.

EVENTS

BUSHWAKKER OFFSALE

Our award-winning beer can be enjoyed at home as well as in the pub. Available in single 650 ml bottles or six-packs. We encourage you to mix a six pack. Variety is the spice of life! Our beer is also available in four sizes of kegs. Perfect for any gathering large or small. If our beer is found under the WHAT'S ON TAP TODAY section of our website, then we should have it available for take home.

BREWPUB

UPLOAD YOUR VIDEOS

Have a fun Wakker Vid? You can upload your YouTube videos here... Check it Out!

WAKKER EVENTS

A BREW-TIFUL THING

The brewery components were built by Specific Mechanical and installed by Newlands... READ MORE ABOUT OUR BREWERY

BREWERY

The Wakker Weekly Current Edition

THE WAKKER WEEKLY - Issue #1226

Posted on: 28-Jul-2014

Bushwakker News

Our premium wines for July are Wayne Gretzky Okanagan VQA Wines from BC: The red is a Cabernet Sauvignon/Syrah. The white is a Pinot Grigio. Both are $7.95 for a glass and $22.95 for a half litre.

Our guest tap now offers Cactus Tap tequila barrel aged and agave cerveza from the Prairie Sun Brewery from Saskatoon.  $6.95 for a pint. 

Your Bushwakker has been involved in a program of major renewal over the last month. All carpeting (stairwells, stage, entrances) has been replaced. New commercial toilets have been installed. The main washroom floors have been renewed. Although this is not evident to our customers, our security system has been upgraded. Still to come are new bathroom exterior walls and stall walls.

We hope that you enjoy our wall decorations that show historical pictures from Regina’s past. We invite submissions of new pictures showing scenes from Regina’s past suitable for major enlargement and mounting on the wall in what was once the darts corner. Contact Kelly at Kelly@bushwakker.com. If she uses your submitted image you will receive a Bushwakker $100 gift certificate.

We have been receiving a number of new specialty imported products lately that will be part of our new specialty import beer and cider menu. Thus far we have received:

  • Magner’s Pear Cider
  • Ommegang Abbey Ale
  • Schneider and Brooklyner Tap 5 Hopfenweisse
  • Steam Whistler Pilsner
  • Rogue Hazelnut Brown Nectar Ale
  • Glutenberg gluten-free IPA
  • Lagunitas A Little Sumpin’ Sumpin’, and
  • Iron Maiden Trooper  



Bushwakker Events

July 21: Monday Night Jazz & Blues. The Ministry of Groove. Jazz/Funk from the 70’s and beyond! 8:00 PM.

July 23: Wednesday Night Folk. Chad Kichukla & The Garage. Americana roots rock inspired by inspirations Springsteen and Earle. 9:00 PM.

July 26: Riders vs. Argonauts. The big Saturday night game starts at 8:00 PM. Enjoy our Argonaut & a Pint feature before or after your visit to Mosaic Stadium. Go Riders go!

July 28: Monday Night Jazz & Blues. Uptown Jazz. The “new & improved” band continues to lay it down in fine form. 8:00 PM.

July 30: Wednesday Night Folk. The Upside of Maybe. Energetic roots/folk/pop/rock group from Stratford, Ontario on a summer Canadian tour. 9:00 PM.

Aug. 1: First Firkin Friday. A longstanding Bushwakker monthly tradition. Enjoy the pomp and circumstance as a piper from The Fraser Pipe Band leads a small keg (the firkin) in a procession throughout the pub. A volunteer is selected to tap the firkin with a handmade wooden maul affectionately named, The Mighty Firkin Wakker. Generally the firkin tapper and all those in the immediate proximity receive a beer shower. Don’t miss the special firkin offering Bushwakker head brewer, Mitch Dalrymple, has prepared this month. 5:30 PM.

Aug. 1 & 2: August Long Weekend Keg Event. A great way to celebrate the Saskatchewan Day long weekend is with a Bushwakker keg. Four different sizes of kegs are available to suit any group. Receive free ice, cups, coasters and the loan of a keg chiller tub with any keg purchased this weekend. Order your keg a few days in advance to avoid disappointment. Things tend to get a little brisk in our brewery every long weekend!

Aug. 2: Food Day Canada 2014. It began in 2003 as The World’s Longest Barbeque, a massive, nationwide response to the sanction of Canadian beef exports by our largest trading partner and the negative consequences it imposed on the Canadian agricultural community. The WLBBQ was a huge success and has evolved into Food Day Canada®, an annual mid-summer celebration, always held on the Saturday of the August long weekend, when we share Canada’s rich culinary heritage and delicious northern bounty. The Bushwakker will once again be participating in this national event by utilizing some very locally sourced ingredients in the creation of a special dish. This year we will offer something a bit different. Bushwakker pastry chef, Tim Wooley will create a memorable cheesecake featuring our famous Blackberry Mead. August 2 also happens to be Mead Day which was created by the American Homebrewing Association in 2002. Tim will incorporate locally sourced goat cheese from SalayView Farm which is located just south of Regina, spent grains from our brewery and a special aged allotment of 2013 Bushwakker Blackberry Mead to create his decadent dessert offering. 

Aug. 4: Monday Night Jazz & Blues. Closed for the Holiday. Enjoy a Bushwakker keg this Saskatchewan Day long weekend!

Aug. 6: Wednesday Night Folk. Theresa & Carol. Great harmonies from this talented folk duo. The real deal. 9:00 PM.

Aug. 7: IPA Day. Join us as IPA fans around the world celebrate what has become the symbolic beer of the entire craft beer movement. Bushwakker head brewer, Mitch Dalrymple will offer his mostinnovative IPA firkin offering to date – a Maker’s Mark Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Dry Hopped Chico IPA! The firkin will be tapped at 5:30 PM. When visiting beer festivals across North America, we often see enthusiastic beer fans dressed up like Hophead Superheros. We encourage all  Regina hophead fans to dress up in hop hats, hop shirts, hop sunglasses, hop necklaces, and even green hop tights and capes and join the firkin procession throughout the pub. The person wearing the best Hophead costume will tap the firkin as well as receive a bright green Bushwakker Chico IPA t-shirt! A number of bottled IPAs will be also be available and our kitchen will offer a tasty meal feature incorporating this iconic beer style as an ingredient. Enjoy Chico IPA Brined St Louis Pork Ribs on pale ale marinated roasted creamer potatoes, topped w/ apple jicama slaw & served w/ tamarind summer sambal. The biggest day of the year for hopheads and craft beer lovers alike. Bitter is indeed better!

Aug. 11: Monday Night Jazz & Blues. Jeff Mertick & The Bluebeat Singers. Local veteran bluesman is joined by a powerhouse vocal duo and backing band. 8:00 PM.

Aug. 13: Wednesday Night Folk. Bradford. Brad Papp and Mark Radford deliver great acoustic folk. 9:00 PM.

Aug. 16: Riders vs Alouettes. Game time is 5:00 PM and we open at 11:00 AM. Stop by before, during or after the game and enjoy our Alouette Burger & a Pint feature. Go Riders go!

Aug. 18: Monday Night Jazz & Blues.  The Regina Jazz Quintet. Great jazz standards receive a youthful twist from this up-and-coming group. 8:00 PM.

Aug. 20: Wednesday Night Folk. Kory Istace Songwriter’s Circle 2. Veteran singer/songwriter, Kory Istace showcases his talents with a number of Regina songwriters. 9:00 PM.

Aug. 25: Monday Night Jazz & Blues. Uptown Jazz. Great jazz standards performed by talented musicians both young and “mature”.8:00 PM

Aug. 27: Wednesday Night Folk. Creek City. Folk/roots/rock group from Swift Current makes their Bushwakker debut. 9:00 PM.

Aug. 29-31: Labour Day Long Weekend Keg Event. A great way to celebrate this football weekend is with a Bushwakker keg. Four different sizes of kegs are available to suit any gathering – large or small. Receive free ice, cups, coasters and the loan of a keg chiller tub with any keg purchased this weekend. Cheer on the Riders with family and friends in front of your screen at home with a Bushwakker keg. Order your keg a few days in advance to avoid disappointment. 

Aug. 31: The Labour Day Classic Burger Battle. We open at 11:00 AM this Sunday morning for one of the biggest games of the year! We welcome our many Winnipeg friends as they make their annual trek to Mosaic Stadium  and to the Bushwakker. To pay tribute to this annual football contest, we not only offer a Bomber Burger and a Pint feature, but also a Rider Burger & a Pint feature. Both burgers will be absolutely delicious. History has demonstrated that the best-selling burger will usually indicate which team will win the Labour Day Classic. Go Team Green!

Sept. 1: Monday Night Jazz & Blues. The Jazz Band-Its. We open at 11:00 AM on Labour Day Monday. A great way to end off a long weekend is with a big band jazz performance from the largest band to ever grace the Bushwakker stage! 8:00 PM.


Three questions

Posted: Thursday, July 17, 2014 10:48 am    James "Dr. Fermento" Roberts 

I've been writing about beer for long enough that people often come up with cutesy crap to ask me about my habit. I get all manner of the "have you tried this beer," or "what do you think about that brewery," and such, but there are three questions that I consistently get asked.

The most common question is "what is your favorite beer." I hope I'm not offending anyone when I reveal that inwardly, I think "what a stupid question” when I'm asked. Beer, in all of its infinite variations is an incredibly situational thing that's based on variables that transcend much more than the beer itself. Consider this: if you asked 10 different people what their favorite pizza is or what their favorite sexual position is, do you think you'd get the same 10 answers?

In addition, as far as I'm concerned, the enjoyment of beer is entirely situational. If I'm working hard, it’s likely that something lighter and quenching does the trick and would be my favorite at the time. When I'm sitting by the fire after a long day at the goldmine, a darker, more brooding beer seems to go better while I’m nudging sticks deeper into the dying fire or kicking at the embers. When

I'm writing, anything goes. I try to write with an open mind and drink with one too when banging on the keys.

So, my pat answer to “what’s your favorite beer?” is “the one in my hand.” And of course I explain my reasoning.

The second most frequent query is “have you ever been to Germany,” which is another silly question. I’m sure you suspect the reason the question is asked, but I usually quip back with “why?” No, I’ve never been to Germany, but just because I’m an avid quality beer lover doesn’t mean I have to go far to find the goods. In fact, a more relevant and deeper question to me would be “if you could visit any country to explore beer, what country would that be?”

Certainly, Germany is the hinterland of beer and most people associate beer’s roots with that country. The place is steeped in both tradition and rich history, and there’s that Oktoberfest thing, but seriously I’d have to say I’d visit Belgium first. Belgium’s robust beer culture is just as interesting and drowning in foamy history, but I find Belgian beer much more perse and enticing.

But, it’s more than that. Why do I have to go to Germany for good beer? Or Belgium? Or anywhere, for that matter? As far as I’m concerned, right here in the United States, and especially in Alaska, we make the best beer in the world.

When you think about it, I’m not just waxing prophetic here. Prior to the craft beer movement of the mid 1980s, American brewers emulated the Euro-styles because that’s how beer in the world was defined. Times have changed. Palates have shifted. American brewers got restless and bored with standard styles and started branching out on their own. We don’t need Germany and Belgium to hold us by the hand any more, and some of the most interesting beers in the world are originating right here in the states. You don’t have to go any further than Alaska’s local breweries and bars to find the best of the best.

Oddly, of late, the third most commonly asked question I get is “you drink so much beer all the time and make a living out of it, how come you’re not fat?” Indeed, the bane of the big beer drinker is the beer belly. I’ll be the first to tell you that until recently it wasn’t some special trick that kept me trim despite un-quantified imbibing of a substance that’s known to pack on pounds. I’ve always been rather genetically indisposed to gaining weight.

Again, until recently (age takes its toll: I’m 56), I’d been on a see-food diet, which means that I’d chow with abandon and compliment rich, calorie and carbohydrate-laden foods with all manner of great, “fatty” craft beer.

Time Out.

I was at the mall the other day eating at the food court. I noticed an old man watching a teenager sitting next to him. The teenager had spiked hair in all different colors: green, red, orange, and blue. 
The old man kept staring at him. The teenager would look and find the old man staring every time. When the teenager had enough, he sarcastically asked, "What's the matter old man, never done anything wild in your life? 

The old man did not bat an eye in his response, "Got drunk once and had sex with a peacock. I was just wondering if you were my son."

A young man saw an elderly couple sitting down to lunch at McDonald's. He noticed that they had ordered one meal, and an extra drink cup. As he watched, the gentleman carefully pided the hamburger in half, then counted out the fries, one for him, one for her, until each had half of them. Then he poured half of the soft drink into the extra cup and set that in front of his wife.

The old man then began to eat, and his wife sat watching, with her hands folded in her lap. 

The young man decided to ask if they would allow him to purchase another meal for them so that they didn't have to split theirs. 

The old gentleman said, "Oh no. We've been married 50 years, and everything has always been and will always be shared, 50/50." 

The young man then asked the wife if she was going to eat, and she replied, "It's his turn with the teeth." 


How to drive a cat mad.



Update: Oktoberfest to have beer, DABC unanimously approves event

June 16, 2014, by Ben Winslow, updated on June 24;  Snowbird’s Oktoberfest will have beer.

The Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control unanimously voted to approve the event Tuesday morning.

Also, a package liquor agency has been approved for the Snowbird resort.

When an area is too small to warrant a state store, private and corporate groups contract with the state to open a liquor store.

SALT LAKE CITY — State lawmakers grilled Utah’s liquor control agency over its rules and policies that could lead to “Oktoberfest without beer.”
In a hearing before the Utah State Legislature’s Administrative Rules Committee on Monday, lawmakers questioned why the Utah Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission was scrutinizing who gets so-called “single event permits,” generating international headlines.

“The commission seems to bore in on issues which are not particularly law enforcement-related, but manage to turn Utah into the laughing stock of the world,” said Sen. Jim Dabakis, D-Salt Lake City.

FOX 13 first reported in May that the DABC was scrutinizing how it hands out single-event permits for festivals and other events. Liquor agency commissioners were looking at whether the events being held really were community events, or just money-makers for the business hosting them.

Snowbird, which sought a permit for its annual “BrewFest,” raised concerns that it could doom their wildly popular Oktoberfest. Snowbird submitted their applications for Oktoberfest on Thursday, Petilos told FOX 13. The full commission was expected to vote on it later this month.

Appearing before lawmakers on Monday, DABC Commissioner John Nielsen said they were reviewing their rules, to comply with what the Utah State Legislature intended.

“Sometimes those rules create more confusion than they do help,” he said.

DABC Commissioners planned to review their policies on granting or denying single-event permits beginning Tuesday. The Utah State Legislature may also become involved during the next session.

“I think what we’ve been moving towards, legislatively, and putting into action over the past number of years is to create more hospitality and not hostility,” said Senate Minority Leader Gene Davis, D-Salt Lake City.

DABC Director Sal Petilos told the committee they follow the rules and statutes passed by the legislature. Lawmakers pressed him on what had changed to prompt such scrutiny.

“Given the history of DABC, I wanted to make sure we were in compliance,” he said, referring to a series of scandals that rocked the agency in previous years.

Sen. Howard Stephenson, R-Sandy, said the situation created a “perfect storm” of bad publicity for the state. He urged the DABC to consult with the legislature about intent.

“That’s just a word of advice from a Monday-morning quarterback,” he said. “As you look at rewriting the rule to avoid this international attention to ‘Utah as a place you don’t want to vacation,’ if you would give us feedback as a legislature on things to make your job easier to accomplish things.”

Throughout the hour-long hearing, DABC staffers insisted they were acting on what the legislature passed and intended, with lawmakers countering that they were frustrated with headlines mocking Utah’s liquor laws.

Sen. Mark Madsen, R-Saratoga Springs, made a bold statement by suggesting it was time Utah got out of the liquor control business.

“Every time government embarks on a social engineering quest, there are always consequences,” he said.

Other lawmakers did not appear to share his sentiment.

“That’s best left for another argument,” Sen. Stephenson replied.

Ed. Comment: Too bad that the SLGA doesn’t seem to care if they make our province a laughing stock or not.

Our weekend Seafood Feature is Smoked Salmon Salad w/ Hemp Seed Citrus Vinaigrette. $15.95

 

Soup & Sandwich Special is $11.95.  All hot specials are $15.95, except where noted, and include a serving of soup du jour, chopped, or Caesar salad. 
 

Soup

Sandwich

Dinner

Fri., July 25

Creamy Tomato

Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato & Smoked Salmon Croissant

Chili Garlic 10oz Ribeye w/ Stirfry veg & Dashi Noodles. $17.95

Sat., July 26

Bushwakker

Burger & a Pint. $15.95

Steak & a Pint. $17.95

Mon., July 28

Tomato Vegetable Noodle

Grilled Cheese w/ Tomato & Bacon

Roast Tomato Chipotle & Sausage Linguini

Tues., July 29

Sausage & Bean

BBQ Chicken Pizza. $13.95

Pork Stroganoff

Wed., July 30

Chili Beef w/ Crispy Tortillas

Beef Tort Wrap

Ginger & Cucumber Mushroom Roman Noodle Bowl

Thur., July 31

Orange Pork & Chickpea

Jerk Chicken Wrap w/ Mango Chutney

Yellow Chicken Curry

Fri., August 1

Creamy Chicken Dill

Jumbo Egg Salad Wrap

Shrimp & Chicken Stuffed Beef Tenderloin w/ Apple Albafuro Sauce, Roast Zucchini & Fried Potatoes. $18.95

Sat., August 2

Bushwakker

Ham & Cheese Potato Pie

Steak & a Pint. $17.95

The Wakker Weekly Last Week

THE WAKKER WEEKLY - Issue #1225

Posted on: 21-Jul-2014

Bushwakker News

Our premium wines for July are Wayne Gretzky Okanagan VQA Wines from BC: The red is a Cabernet Sauvignon/Syrah. The white is a Pinot Grigio. Both are $7.95 for a glass and $22.95 for a half litre. Our guest tap now offers Cactus Tap tequila barrel aged and agave cerveza from the Prairie Sun Brewery from Saskatoon. $6.95 for a pint.

We hope that you enjoy our wall decorations that show historical pictures from Regina’s past. We invite submissions of new pictures showing scenes from Regina’s past suitable for major enlargement and mounting on the wall in what was once the darts corner. Contact Kelly at kelly@bushwakker.com. If she uses your submitted image you will receive a Bushwakker $100 gift certificate.

Bushwakker Growlers

The Bushwakker now offers two styles of growlers; Stainless Steel for $40 plus tax and glass for $15 plus tax. We fill all growlers and we also offer a growler cozy (an insulted carrying bag) for both growler styles, for $12 plus tax.We remind our growler customers that they may need to wait to get their growler filled when we are very busy.

Bushwakker Events

July 21: Monday Night Jazz & Blues. The Ministry of Groove. Jazz/Funk from the 70’s and beyond! 8:00 PM.

July 23: Wednesday Night Folk. Chad Kichukla & The Garage. Americana roots rock inspired by inspirations Springsteen and Earle. 9:00 PM.

July 26: Riders vs. Argonauts. The big Saturday night game starts at 8:00 PM. Enjoy our Argonaut & a Pint feature before or after your visit to Mosaic Stadium. Go Riders go!

July 28: Monday Night Jazz & Blues. Uptown Jazz. The “new & improved” band continues to lay it down in fine form. 8:00 PM.

July 30: Wednesday Night Folk. The Upside of Maybe. Energetic roots/folk/pop/rock group from Stratford, Ontario on a summer Canadian tour. 9:00 PM.

 


July 9, 2014 | Jim Galligan |

New Shock Top Video Campaign Calls Out Craft Beers for “Trying Too Hard”

If you needed another clue that craft-beer-pretender Shock Top is the baby of Big Beer, look no further than these “viral” videos from Canadian ad agency Anomaly that rolled onto Shock Top’s YouTube channel last week. They are just what you might expect from a large corporation (A-B InBev) trying to act like one of the cool kids.

In this series of clearly staged videos, Shock Top mascot “Wedgehead” – a talking orange slice with a mohawk – accosts various actors “unsuspecting beer lovers” in the beer aisle and at the bar, peppering them with quick-witted regular-guy quips about their appearance, their ability to attract the opposite sex, and other clearly scripted “spontaneous” conversations.

The nature of these videos fit perfectly with the Shock Top brand – a highly calculated attempt to come off as authentic, but missing the mark by just enough to show that you’re a complete fraud.
There are the actors, each clearly chosen to represent a demographic group Shock Top wants to target (one girl even has lots of tattoos – HOW GENUINE!).

There’s the messaging, clearly on-brand, but hiding behind “irreverent” humor that supports the tagline, “Listen, you know I’m a good beer, I know I’m a good beer – we don’t have to talk about it, let’s chat about something else.”

There’s the computer enhanced graphics in the beer aisle videos, made to look just like the real thing (but not the real thing). Yup – that’s Shock Top in a nutshell.

Along with attempting to paint itself as a hip alternative to the mainstream, Shock Top also uses Wedgehead (ugh- that hurt to type) to take potshots at their craft beer competitors (you know, beers that are actually made in small batches by independent breweries).

In one of the videos entitled “My dad is losing his Mohawk,” the edgy wedge proclaims, “You guys know these beers…they’re trying too hard, you know what I mean? Fifteen names? Wildebeest Three Headed Unicorn? What is that?” The bar patrons he’s talking to titter with laughter, because they clearly agree – those other craft beers are SO PRETENTIOUS, but not you, Wedgehead – you’re our cool pal!

I’ve posted all the videos I can find below (sorry) so you can check them out for yourself. And if you happen to be wandering around the streets of Toronto, look out for the talking Shock Top billboard – god help you.

I guess the good news here is that the Big Boys will always show their true colors; their attempt to come off as totally non-corporate couldn’t feel MORE corporate. Hopefully that’ll stop some folks from confusing this pretender for an honest-to-goodness craft brewery. 

 

What are these mannequins doing? 


Oregon Sets Sales Record for Locally Made Beer

Posted June 26, 2014 by David Eisenberg

Oregon’s affinity for local craft beer has reached an unprecedented high, as more than 18 percent of all beer consumed in the state last year was locally produced, according to the Oregon Brewers Guild.

Of the 1.4 million barrels the state’s breweries produced last year—an uptick of 8 percent over the year prior—500,000 were sold to Oregonians, a new in-state sales record.

After adding more than 200 jobs in 2013, the state’s brewing companies now directly employ more than 6,600 people, the Guild added.

Additionally, retail sales of beer produced in the state totaled more than $400 million last year, according to the guild, as the industry at large contributed $2.83 billion to the state’s economy, while also employing “roughly 29,000 people directly and indirectly.”

“We have the largest number of breweries per capita and also the highest percentage of dollars spent on craft beer in the U.S.,” Brian Butenschoen, executive director of the state’s brewer’s guild, said in a statement. “Hood River has a brewery for every 1,433 residents and Portland has more breweries than any other city in the world.”

One of those Hood River breweries is Full Sail Brewing Co., which has been in business since 1987, years before the so-called craft beer revolution washed over the country.

Andy Krakauer, the brewery’s new vice president of sales — who was hired earlier this month — and an Oregon native himself, attributes much of the local love of craft beer to a pervasive sense of pride for all things home-grown.

“There’s a tremendous amount of pride in anything that’s Oregon-made, Oregon-brewed,” he said. “People try to support the products in-state in a number of industries.”

Krakauer added, however, that the type of growth seen in the guild’s study could at some point level off due to increased market saturation, though he is hopeful that time isn’t near on the horizon.

One of the biggest challenges now, he said, not only in his craft crazy state, but throughout the country, is figuring out how to stand out from the crowd, which seems to be getting bigger and bigger.

“It’s just the thing that becomes tough for everybody. There’s a lot of rotation amongst brands out here,” he said. “Everyone’s working hard to set themselves up to be the craft of choice.”

Jim Brady, Full Sail’s Pacific Northwest regional sales manager, who is also new with the company, having started in April, reiterated that idea, and said to be the craft brand of choice in not only a state as saturated as Oregon, but throughout the country, brewers need to adapt to the attitudes of the consumer.

“The palate of the consumer has changed,” he said. “The beer consumer, they’re picking up more variety, more flavor, if you will, in their beer. That’s been fairly consistent, not just in Portland, not just Seattle, but throughout the country.”

Though in Oregon, despite the challenge of keeping relevant in the rotation, the dedication to local has prevailed, as an estimated 53 percent of all draft beer consumed in the state last year was brewed in Oregon.

Overall craft production grew 18 percent in the U.S., the guild added, and accounts for 7.8 percent of the total volume of beer brewed in the country.

Ed. Comment: Population Oregon 3.9 million, population Saskatchewan 1.1 million. So to be on track with Oregon we should be producing 460,000 hl of beer, and creating 1900 jobs in SK.


Time Out; Flying

One day at a busy airport, the passengers on a commercial airliner are seated, waiting for the crew to show up so they can get under way.

The pilot and co-pilot finally appear in the rear of the plane, and begin walking up to the cockpit through the center aisle. Both appear to be blind. The pilot is using a white cane, bumping into passengers right and left as he stumbles down the aisle, and the co-pilot is using a guide dog. Both have their eyes covered with huge sunglasses. At first the passengers do not react; thinking that it must be some sort of practical joke. However, after a few minutes the engines start spooling up and the airplane starts moving down the runway.

The passengers look at each other with some uneasiness, whispering among themselves and looking desperately to the stewardesses for reassurance. Then the airplane starts accelerating rapidly and people begin panicking.

Some passengers are praying, and as the plane gets closer and closer to the end of the runway, the voices are becoming more and more hysterical. Finally, when the airplane has less than 20 feet of runway left, there is a sudden change in the pitch of the shouts as everyone screams at once, and at the very last moment the airplane lifts off and is airborne.

Up in the cockpit, the co-pilot breathes a sigh of relief and turns to the Captain, "You know, one of these days the passengers aren't going to scream and we're gonna get killed!"

Logged maintenance complaints by QANTAS pilots (P for problem) and the corrective action (S for solution) recorded by mechanics.

P: Test flight OK, except autoland very rough.

S: Autoland not installed on this aircraft.

P: Something loose in cockpit.

S: Something tightened in cockpit.

P: Dead bugs on windshield.

S: Live bugs on backorder.

P: Evidence of leak on right main landing gear.

S: Evidence removed.

P: Number 3 engine missing.

S: Engine found on right wing after brief search.

P: Aircraft handles funny.

S: Aircraft warned to straighten up, fly right, and be serious.

Our weekend Seafood Feature is Pan Seared Barramundi w/ Asparagus Zucchini Salad & Sea Asparagus Hash. $17.95

Soup & Sandwich Special is $11.95.

All hot specials are $15.95, except where noted, and include a serving of soup du jour, chopped, or Caesar salad.


 

Soup

Sandwich

Dinner 

Fri., July 18

Seafood Chowder

Dagwood Club on Multi-Grain

Manicotti w/ Garlic Toast

Sat., July 19

Bushwakker

Classic Clubhouse

Steak & a Pint. $17.95

Mon., July 21

Jalapeno Corn ‘n Bacon

Hot Brown

Fried Chicken w/ Mashed Potatoes & Gravy

Tues., July 22

Root Vegetable & Sausage

Pulled Beef & Roasted Tomato Pizza. $13.95

Shrimp & Avocado Linguini

Wed., July 23

Mushroom & Rice

Sausage & Bean Chili Bowl

Cider Brined Pork Chop w/ Grilled Cauliflower & Curried Apples

Thur., July 24

Indian Beef & Cabbage

Spicy Chicken Cheesesteak

Grilled Swordfish w/ Coriander Mint Butter & Hot Quinoa Salad

Fri., July 25

CreamyTomato

Bacon, Lettuce, Tomato & Smoked Salmon Croissant

Chili Garlic 10oz Ribeye w/ Stirfry veg & Dashi Noodles. $17.95

Sat., July 26

Bushwakker

Burger & a Pint. $15.95

Steak & a Pint. $17.95

Photo Gallery

WAKKER WEEKLY NEWSLETTER

The Wakker Weekly

There is so much going on at the Bushwakker that it is tough to keep track of it all. Subscribe to our weekly electronic newsletterto keep up to date on upcoming Bushwakker events, upcoming Bushwakker beer and guest import beer offereings, local, national and internation beer news, humour column and daily kitchen specials for the upcoming week!   READ THIS WEEKS WAKKER WEEKLY

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The Wakker Weekly

There is so much going on at the Bushwakker that it is tough to keep track of it all. Subscribe to our weekly electronic newsletterto keep up to date on upcoming Bushwakker events, upcoming Bushwakker beer and guest import beer offereings, local, national and internation beer news, humour column and daily kitchen specials for the upcoming week!   READ THIS WEEKS WAKKER WEEKLY

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BUSHWAKKER BREWING COMPANY LTD.
2206 DEWDNEY AVE,
REGINA, SK, CANADA,
PHONE: 306·359·7276

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PRIVATE ROOMS

In response to growing demand
we have recently expanded our
seating capacity by 20%...
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ABOUT US

OUR HISTORY

The sequence of events that lead to the existence of what the Globe and Mail considers... MORE ABOUT OUR HISTORY

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our never ending supply of draft beer... VIEW ALL

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T-Shirts, caps, glasswear and more! Show your spirit... VIEW OUR WAKKER WEAR

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Meet the Bushwakker Management Team... CLICK HERE

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MESSIEST FIRKIN TAPPING

Check out the St. Paddy's day celebrations this year at Bushwakker. You gotta ask yourself... "did she really just do that?

FIRST FIRKIN FRIDAY

On the first Friday of each month at 5:30 PM, a firkin (small keg) of f resh ale is paraded through the pub led by members of The Fraser Pipe Band. A volunteer is selected to tap the firkin. Squirting beer usually soaks the volunteer and all those in the immediate proximity. If you have a special event you would like to commemorate by tapping the firkin, just email us at bar@bushwakker.com.

Wakker Wear

Please email us at with what you would like to order and your location in the world and we will make arrangements for your Bushwakker Merchandise.

Wakker Wear

Bushwakker Cheryl Quote Shirt

Bushwakker Cheryl Quote Shirt - $20.00each

Another "brew"tiful shirt in our latest quote collections. This one sports a quote from Bushwakkers' own Cheryl. Colours: brown or rust. Sizes: M & XXL.

WAKKER WEAR

Wakker Wear

Bushwakker Chico IPA T-Shirt

Bushwakker Chico IPA T-Shirt - $30.00each

Hopheads will love this colourful shirt proclaiming their enthusiasm for one of our most popular beers. Sizes: M, L, XL. Colour: bright green

WAKKER WEAR

Wakker Wear

Bushwakker Grand Pilsener Etched Glass

Bushwakker Grand Pilsener Etched Glass - $5.00each

Our most popular souvenir glass to date. Big enough to hold the entire contents of a Bushwakker take home glass bottle of beer.

WAKKER WEAR

Wakker Wear

Bushwakker Hat

Bushwakker Hat - $15.00each

Bad hair day? Try our Bushwakker headgear. Available in black or green.

WAKKER WEAR

Wakker Wear

Bushwakker Ladies T-Shirt

Bushwakker Ladies T-Shirt - $16.00each

A "brew"tiful new shirt in a women's cut. With a classic quote by one of the new world's great philosophers, inventors and partaker of the brewed curd - Benjamin Franklin. Colours: blue or beige. Sizes: M & L

WAKKER WEAR

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Bushwakker Poster

Bushwakker Poster - $6.00each

A beautiful full colour poster worthy of framing and hanging in the den next to your beer fridge.

WAKKER WEAR

Wakker Wear

Bushwakker Sweatshirt

Bushwakker Sweatshirt - $25.00each

Want to keep warm? Try a Bushwakker sweatshirt; they're functional, comfortable, and the just the thing that you're loved one will try to "appropriate". So why not get two? Available in XL.

WAKKER WEAR

Wakker Wear

Bushwakker Pom-Pom Touque

Bushwakker Pom-Pom Touque - $23.00each

A Green and Yellow toque with a POM-POM... and of course our logo.

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Bushwakker Touque

Bushwakker Touque - $20.00each

It's a black toque with our logo on it...

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Bushwakker Grim Brewer - Beer To Die For - T-Shirt

Bushwakker Grim Brewer - Beer To Die For - T-Shirt - $22.00each

If you've had the beer you know the story. Express your feeling for top-notch beer with this shirt. Available in M, L and XL.

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Wakker Wear

Bushwakker T-Shirt

Bushwakker T-Shirt - $22.00each

Before the Cult T-shirt, there was the original Bushwakker T-Shirt featuring the Joe Fafard created Bushwakker logo. Available in M, L, XL and XXL.

WAKKER WEAR

Wakker Wear

Bushwakker We Love Craft Beer T-Shirt

Bushwakker We Love Craft Beer T-Shirt - $25.00each

A form fitting t-shirt available in both men’s and women’s styles. Two hops form a heart on the front and the brewing process is depicted on the back. Sizes: M, L, XL, XXL. Colour: green

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The Best of Monday Night Jazz at The Bushwakker CD

The Best of Monday Night Jazz at The Bushwakker CD - $15.00each

Our popular Monday night music program has been going strong for over a decade. Enjoy eleven live cuts featuring eleven fine Regina jazz acts.

WAKKER WEAR

Wakker Wear

The Bushwakker Six-Pack CD

The Bushwakker Six-Pack CD - $15.00each

Great classical compositions written by former Regina Symphony Orchestra principal oboist, Elizabeth Raum. The six selections were each inspired by a unique Bushwakker beer.

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BUSHWAKKER STAINLESS STEEL GROWLERS

BUSHWAKKER STAINLESS STEEL GROWLERS - $40.00each

The Bushwakker now offers growlers just in time for Father’s Day! Our Stainless Steel, two-liter, flip-top growlers will be available on Friday, June 13 at 4:00 PM. They make a unique Father’s Day gift. Buy the growler for $40 (plus taxes). Refill it as many times as you wish with any fresh beer of your choice for $15.

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FROM THE KITCHEN

Before the Bushwakker opened in January 1991 we had already spent several years visiting others brewpubs and unique restaurants and North America, looking the best ideas for what was to be... THE BUSHWAKKER PHILOSOPHY

FROM THE KITCHEN

UPCOMING EVENTS

Check out the events happening at the Bushwakker for the next several months. VIEW EVENTS

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Google Map

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WE'RE SOCIAL!

Check out our Facebook page, and while you're there invite some friends to "Like" the Bushwakker Brewpub! Bushwakker Facebook

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THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1216 - Posted on: 19-May-2014

The people at Adspark have been working on a new Bushwakker website which has incorporate the sending of this newsletter in a new way, so this may be your first Wakker Weekly to be receive this way. READ FULL ARTICLE

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THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1217 - Posted on: 27-May-2014

After a number of technical hickups we did indeed get last week’s Wakker Weekly out in the new format. Since then we’ve received a number of both praises and complaints about the new style. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1218 - Posted on: 30-May-2014

Our premium wines for June are from California. The red is Purple Cowboy Tenacious Red, a Cabernet/Syrah blend. The white is Menage A Troi, a Chardonnay/Muscat Alexandria/Chenin Blanc blend. Both are $8.50 glass and $24.95 half litre. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1219 - Posted on: 06-Jun-2014

Bushwakker’s Regina Pale Ale just took gold in the English Pale Ale category at the Canadian Brewing Awards. Congratulations to head brewer Mitch and all of the brewery staff. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1220 - Posted on: 16-Jun-2014

Our premium wines for June are from California. The red is Purple Cowboy Tenacious Red, a Cabernet/Syrah blend. The white is Menage A Trois, a Chardonnay/Muscat Alexandria/Chenin Blanc blend. Both are $8.50 glass and $24.95 half litre. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1221 - Posted on: 23-Jun-2014

Our premium wines for June are from California. The red is Purple Cowboy Tenacious Red, a Cabernet/Syrah blend. The white is Menage A Troi, a Chardonnay/Muscat Alexandria/Chenin Blanc blend. Both are $8.50 glass and $24.95 half litre. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1222 - Posted on: 30-Jun-2014

Our premium wines for July are Wayne Gretzky Okanagan VQA Wines from BC: The red is a Cabernet Sauvignon/Syrah. The white is a Pinot Grigio. Both are $7.95 for a glass and $22.95 for a half litre
Our guest tap now offers St. Ambroise Apricot Wheat from the McAuslan Brewery in Montreal. $7.95 for a pint. Next up is the Paddock Wood Belgian Wit for $7.95 pint. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1223 - Posted on: 07-Jul-2014

Our premium wines for July are Wayne Gretzky Okanagan VQA Wines from BC: The red is a Cabernet Sauvignon/Syrah. The white is a Pinot Grigio. Both are $7.95 for a glass and $22.95 for a half litre READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1224 - Posted on: 14-Jul-2014

Our premium wines for July are Wayne Gretzky Okanagan VQA Wines from BC: The red is a Cabernet Sauvignon/Syrah. The white is a Pinot Grigio. Both are $7.95 for a glass and $22.95 for a half litre Our guest tap now offers the Mikkeller Super Galena Single Hop Series IPA from Denmark for $8.95 pint. Next up is the Paddock Wood Belgian Wit for $7.95 pint. Bushwakker’s own Summer Wheat Beer is now available. We also now have available Growler Cozy’s (insulated carrying bags) for your Stainless Steel or glass growler in bright orange with the Fafard Logo in gun-metal green.$12 plus tax. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1225 - Posted on: 21-Jul-2014

Our premium wines for July are Wayne Gretzky Okanagan VQA Wines from BC: The red is a Cabernet Sauvignon/Syrah. The white is a Pinot Grigio. Both are $7.95 for a glass and $22.95 for a half litre Our guest tap now offers Cactus Tap tequila barrel aged and agave cerveza from the Prairie Sun Brewery from Saskatoon. $6.95 for a pint. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1226 - Posted on: 28-Jul-2014

Our premium wines for July are Wayne Gretzky Okanagan VQA Wines from BC: The red is a Cabernet Sauvignon/Syrah. The white is a Pinot Grigio. Both are $7.95 for a glass and $22.95 for a half litre. Our guest tap now offers Cactus Tap tequila barrel aged and agave cerveza from the Prairie Sun Brewery from Saskatoon. $6.95 for a pint. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY

THE WAKKER WEEKLY

Issue #1227 - Posted on: 04-Aug-2014

Our premium wines for August are from the Sandhill Estate Vineyard in B. C. The red is a Merlot VQA. The white is a Pinot Blanc VQA. Both are $8.50 for a glass and $24.95 for a half litre. Our guest tap now offers Cactus Tap tequila barrel aged and agave cerveza from the Prairie Sun Brewery from Saskatoon. $6.95 for a pint. READ FULL ARTICLE

WAKKER WEEKLY